Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

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Best Inventions of the Year 2012

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 2, 2012


Robots, rovers and the rest of 2012’s most important innovations, from the affordable to the extreme


That’s not Photoshop. The Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde has developed a way to create a small, perfect white cloud in the middle of a room. It requires meticulous planning: the temperature, humidity and lighting all have to be just so. Once everything is ready, Smilde summons the cloud out of the air using a fog machine. It lasts only moments, but the effect is dramatic and strangely moving. It evokes both the surrealism of Magritte and the classical beauty of the old masters while reminding us of the ephemerality of art and nature.

Lytro Light Field Camera

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Say hello to Lytro, a new consumer-grade camera capable of focusing on multiple points in an image with eye-popping accuracy after you’ve snapped the picture. We first heard about it this summer, and now it has a release timeframe: early next year.

Siri

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In a phone with lots of evolutionary qualities, Siri is the iPhone 4S’s most revolutionary feature. Simply by speaking to this virtual assistant, you can set reminders, send text messages, look up information and schedule meetings.

3D Processors

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From Avatar‘s tawny-eyed, blue-skinned aliens to high-def Blu-ray movies to Nintendo’s totable 3DS, everyone’s hip to 3D, and the latest company to hop onboard looks to be–wait a second, Intel?

Yep, Intel, as in Intel 3D microprocessors. No, you won’t need dorky glasses to run your next computer, but using sophisticated 3D assembly tricks, Intel announced it’s found a pretty cool new way to reduce size and power requirements in upcoming batches of CPUs.

Twitter-Based Hedge Funds

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Want to stay ahead of the Dow Jones? Apparently, the new way to do it is to pay attention to Twitter. A paper from the Universities of Indiana and Manchester called “Twitter Mood Predicts The Stock Market” seems to suggest that the overall mood of the social network is a surprisingly good indicator of where the market will go soon afterwards.

Holographic Mapping

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 Here’s how it works: A computer pipes satellite imagery through a projector onto a tabletop sandbox (no really, an actual sandbox). Color-coded areas show where to move the sand (with your hands) to quickly create hills, mountain peaks and valleys. By the time you’re finished, you have a box with astonishingly accurate contours, overlaid by a topographical digital image that makes the whole thing look almost holographic

@TIME

 

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