Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘2011 Year In Review’

Year In News 2011: The Stories That Changed Our World Most Over The Last 12 Months

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 24, 2011

Given that each one is 365 (and a bit) days long, it’s usually possible to fit in a fair amount of news into the course of a year.

Even so we don’t think we’re alone in thinking that there has been just a little bit more news this year than usual.

From the Arab Spring to the London riots and from natural disasters to dictators falling like dominos, at almost every turn the news in 2011 has challenged the established order.

We’ve taken a look back at the biggest stories of the year, as well as the best photos that illustrated them.

The Deep Economic Winter And The Bright Arab Spring

In the UK 2011 began with fresh concerns about the economy, after a rise in VAT to 20% took holdand GDP contracted by around 0.5%.

Across the Arab world, however, 2011 began with severe convulsions to the established political order.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Advertisements

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Year In Review: 2011’s Biggest Events

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 24, 2011

 

When Mohamed Bouazizi, a young Tunisian fruit seller, set himself on fire toward the end of December 2010, he did so out of economic despair and outrage over rampant corruption in his native Sidi Bouzid.

In 2011, the world saw protest movements that demanded an end to that inequality. Bouazizi became a symbol for millions of people around the world who found themselves similarly facing daily government oppression and misrule. “The people want the downfall of the regime” became a slogan that united people across Syria, Yemen, Libya, Egypt and Tunisia.

Protests toppled leaders that previously had seemed untouchable — Muammar Gaddafi in Libya, Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, Tunisia’s Zine Abidine Ben Ali and Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh. Meanwhile, the brutal crimes of the governments of Syria and Bahrain captured headlines worldwide and rose to the top of the international agenda.

In the United States, activists in New York’s Zuccotti park launched a protest movement that challenged corporate culture and the unequal division of wealth. Protesters questioned the foundations of the global economic system and defended the rights of “the 99 percent.”

Natural disasters continued to wreak havoc around the world, with floods in the Philippines killing nearly one thousand, devastating earthquakes in Turkey killing hundreds as buildings collapsed, and the worst earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan’s history creating a nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. The United States claimed the deaths of al Qaeda’s leader Osama bin Laden in Pakistan, and the American, radical Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: