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Posts Tagged ‘Albert Einstein’

A 65-year-old letter written by Albert Einstein found in Brazil school

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 2, 2015

The letter was reportedly discovered in a safe at a school in Porto Alegre in the south of the country.

CYPP7D Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physicist, Portrait

CYPP7D Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physicist, Portrait

Donna-Bowater_60_1932285jBy , Rio de Janeiro

A letter from Albert Einstein written almost 65 years ago has been discovered in a safe at a Brazilian school, according to reports.

A typed message, with the signature of the physicist and dated June 1951, was addressed to students at Colégio Anchieta in Porto Alegre in the south of the country.

Written in German, it read: “He who knows the happiness of understanding has gained an infallible friend for life. Thinking is to man what flying is to birds. Don’t follow the example of a chicken when you could be a lark.”

The note was authenticated by a legal expert and graphologist, who matched the signature against officially accepted examples of Einstein’s autograph, local media reported.

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‘Dear Einstein, Do Scientists Pray?’ Asks Sixth Grader

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 1, 2014

Einstein On The Porch

“Do scientists pray?”

That’s the question that occupied the thoughts of a sixth-grade Sunday school class at The Riverside Church, and who better to pose it to than one of the best scientific minds of our time, Albert Einstein?

A young girl named Phyllis penned a polite and inquisitive note to the great physicist, and she was probably surprised to receive a considerate reply. The exchange was published in the book “Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children,” edited by Alice Calaprice.

She wrote:

January 19, 1936 My dear Dr. Einstein,

We have brought up the question: Do scientists pray? in our Sunday school class. It began by asking whether we could believe in both science and religion. We are writing to scientists and other important men to try and have our own question answered.

We will feel greatly honored if you will answer our question: Do scientists pray, and what do they pray for?

We are in the sixth grade, Miss Ellis’s class.

Respectfully yours,

Phyllis Read the rest of this entry »

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When Einstein Met Tagore

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 10, 2013

by 

Collision and convergence in Truth and Beauty at the intersection of science and spirituality.

On July 14, 1930, Albert Einstein welcomed into his home on the outskirts of Berlin the Indian philosopher Rabindranath Tagore. The two proceeded to have one of the most stimulating, intellectually riveting conversations in history, exploring the age-old friction between science and religionScience and the Indian Tradition: When Einstein Met Tagore recounts the historic encounter, amidst a broader discussion of the intellectual renaissance that swept India in the early twentieth century, germinating a curious osmosis of Indian traditions and secular Western scientific doctrine.

The following excerpt from one of Einstein and Tagore’s conversations dances between previously examined definitions of sciencebeautyconsciousness, andphilosophy in a masterful meditation on the most fundamental questions of human existence.

EINSTEIN: Do you believe in the Divine as isolated from the world?

TAGORE: Not isolated. The infinite personality of Man comprehends the Universe. There cannot be anything that cannot be subsumed by the human personality, and this proves that the Truth of the Universe is human Truth.

I have taken a scientific fact to explain this — Matter is composed of protons and electrons, with gaps between them; but matter may seem to be solid. Similarly humanity is composed of individuals, yet they have their interconnection of human relationship, which gives living unity to man’s world. The entire universe is linked up with us in a similar manner, it is a human universe. I have pursued this thought through art, literature and the religious consciousness of man. Read the rest of this entry »

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5 Things Really Smart People Do

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 6, 2012

By Kevin Daum, visit Inc.

r-SMART-PEOPLE-large570Most people don’t really think much about how they learn. Generally you assume learning comes naturally. You listen to someone speak either in conversation or in a lecture and you simply absorb what they are saying, right? Not really. In fact, I find as I get older that real learning takes more work. The more I fill my brain with facts, figures, and experience, the less room I have for new ideas and new thoughts. Plus, now I have all sorts of opinions that may refute the ideas being pushed at me. Like many people I consider myself a lifelong learner, but more and more I have to work hard to stay open minded.

But the need for learning never ends, so your desire to do so should always outweigh your desire to be right. The world is changing and new ideas pop up everyday; incorporating them into your life will keep you engaged and relevant. The following are the methods I use to stay open and impressionable. They’ll work for you too. No matter how old you get.

1. Quiet Your Inner Voice

You know the one I am talking about. It’s the little voice that offers a running commentary when you are listening to someone. It’s the voice that brings up your own opinion about the information being provided. It is too easy to pay more attention to the inner voice than the actual speaker. That voice often keeps you from listening openly for good information and can often make you shut down before you have heard the entire premise. Focus less on what your brain has to say and more on the speaker. You may be surprised at what you hear. Read the rest of this entry »

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EINSTEIN’S OFFICE: GENIUS IN THE DETAILS

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 25, 2012

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Albert Einstein’s Brain May Provide Clues To His Genius, Study Says

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 18, 2012

Einstein and his theories – the best achievement in the whole human history

By  

Albert Einstein Brain
Called the “embodiment of pure intellect,” Albert Einstein has long been considered one of the most brilliant men who ever lived. During his life and since his death, people everywhere have wondered how one man could have possessed such genius.

Now, scientists may have uncovered a clue within the physicist’s unusual brain.

einstein
The images of Einstein’s brain are published in Falk, Lepore & Noe 2012, (The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs, “Brain”) and are reproduced here with permission from the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Silver Spring, Md.

According to a new study led by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk, “portions of Einstein’s brain have been found to be unlike those of most people and could be related to his extraordinary cognitive abilities.” Read the rest of this entry »

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A Vibrant Past: Colorizing the Archives of History

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 26, 2012

Photo colorization by Sanna Dullaway for TIME / Original image by Alexander Gardner / Library of Congress 1862. Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand at Antietam.

Technology has given us an incredibly wide-ranging view of modern presidents; chief White House photographer Pete Souza’s images of Barack Obama show him in countless locations and situations, from meetings in the Oval Office to candid shots of the president eating ice cream with his daughters on vacation.

The photo archive of Abraham Lincoln, the subject of this week’s cover story, is a much smaller set due to the technological limitations of the time; most of the existing photographs of the 16th president are posed portraits, the majority of which only show Lincoln from the chest up—and all are black-and-white. Read the rest of this entry »

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From Quanta to Qualia: The Mystery of Reality

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 9, 2012

By Deepak Chopra

This piece was co-written with Menas Kafatos, Ph.D. and Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D.

Wherever reality leads, science follows. The two are inseparably linked, as they must be when science is our way of knowing reality. Reality shifts in ways that are unpredictable and strange. Time and space took very strange turns a century ago, for example, while cause and effect turned into a game of probabilities, and the solid physical universe dissolved into invisible energy clouds. Quantum theory had arrived, keeping pace with where reality led it. What Einstein called the “spookiness” of activity at the quantum level has only become spookier since.

Now it appears that reality is about to lead us into new, unexpected paths once more. A hint of the future was provided decades ago by one of the most brilliant quantum pioneers, Wolfgang Pauli, when he said, “It is my personal opinion that in the science of the future reality will neither be ‘psychic’ nor ‘physical’ but somehow both and somehow neither.” By using a word that science shuns, “psychic,” Pauli was pointing to a kind of ultimate mystery. The vast physical mechanism we call the universe behaves more like a mind than like a machine. To thousands of working physicists, the riddle of mind and matter doesn’t apply to their research. But the founder of quantum physics, Max Planck, had no doubt that mind would eventually become the elephant in the room, an issue too massive and obvious to ignore. Planck is worth quoting in full: “I regard consciousness as fundamental. I regard matter as derivative from consciousness. We cannot get behind consciousness. Everything that we talk about, everything that we regard as existing, postulates consciousness.”

The reason that mixing mind with matter disturbs many scientists isn’t a secret. Mind rules the subjective world, while matter is the basis of the physical world, and science is dedicated to gathering objective data from it. Subjectivity is fickle, individual, shifting, and prey to all kinds of bias, if not outright delusion. Consciousness therefore has been systematically excluded from scientific consideration; it’s simply a given that all of us are conscious, and a given doesn’t need to be factored into the equation. Read the rest of this entry »

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Analytical thinking erodes belief in God

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 28, 2012

Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein famously did not believe in a supernatural God, and neither do some scientists today. It now appears there may be a good reason for this: thinking analytically dims supernatural beliefs, apparently by opposing the intuitive thought processes that underpin them.

The vast majority of people believe in a supernatural god or gods, says social psychologist Ara Norenzayan of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Yet there are hundreds of thousands of atheists and agnostics who do not. While scientists have begun to study the psychology of belief, we know little about what causes disbelief.

Humans use two separate cognitive systems for processing information: one that is fast, emotional and intuitive, and another that is slower and more analytical.

The first system innately imputes purpose, personality or mental states to objects, leading to supernatural beliefs. People who rely more on intuitive thinking are more likely to be believers, while the more analytical are less likely. This doesn’t necessarily mean analytical thinking causes disbelief, but activating analytical thinking can override the intuitive system – and vice versa. Norenzayan used this to test the causal relationship. Read the rest of this entry »

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Four-Year-Old Girl With Sky-High IQ Joins Mensa

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 17, 2012

By ERICA HO

RubberBall Productions / the Agency Collection / Getty Images

RUBBERBALL PRODUCTIONS / THE AGENCY COLLECTION / GETTY IMAGES

Meet a 4-year-old girl whose IQ is just one point shy of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. Legos first, the theory of relativity next.

Heidi Hankins, from Winchester, England, is the newest kid on the block to join Mensa, the intellectual organization, with an IQ of 159. At the age of 2, Hankins was reportedly already reading at an 8-year-old level. There are no standardized IQ tests for children under the age of 10, so the toddler was psychologically evaluated.

Back in 2009, Oscar Wrigly joined Mensa at the age of 2 with an IQ of 160 to become the youngest child to ever join the organization. The average IQ in the general population is said to be about 100. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Mighty Mathematician You’ve Never Heard Of

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 30, 2012

By 
Scientists are a famously anonymous lot, but few can match in the depths of her perverse and unmerited obscurity the 20th-century mathematical genius Amalie Noether.
SPL/Photo Researchers

GROUNDBREAKING Emmy Noether’s theorem united two pillars of physics: symmetry in nature and the universal laws of conservation.

Albert Einstein called her the most “significant” and “creative” female mathematician of all time, and others of her contemporaries were inclined to drop the modification by sex. She invented a theorem that united with magisterial concision two conceptual pillars of physics: symmetry in nature and the universal laws of conservation. Some consider Noether’s theorem, as it is now called, as important as Einstein’s theory of relativity; it undergirds much of today’s vanguard research in physics, including the hunt for the almightyHiggs boson. Yet Noether herself remains utterly unknown, not only to the general public, but to many members of the scientific community as well.

When Dave Goldberg, a physicist at Drexel University who has written about her work, recently took a little “Noether poll” of several dozen colleagues, students and online followers, he was taken aback by the results. “Surprisingly few could say exactly who she was or why she was important,” he said. “A few others knew her name but couldn’t recall what she’d done, and the majority had never heard of her.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Albert Einstein’s brain on public display in London

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 29, 2012

By JohnThomas Didymus

London – Sections of the brain of the famous Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein, were put on public display on Thursday at the Wellcome Collection museum in London, as part of the exhibition “Brains: Mind as Matter.”
The exhibition that runs from March 29 to June 17, displays preserved samples of Einstein’s brain on slides on loan from the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia, The Guardian reports. On display are brains of other famous persons such as English mathematician Charles Babbage and some infamous persons such as the murderer William Burke. Also on display is the brain of 19th century killer Edward Rullof, one of the largest known. Visitors will also see on exhibition the brain of U.S. suffragette Helen Gardener, who donated her brain to science to help disprove theories about her gender. The brain of an Ancient Egyptian, the oldest on display, and another with a bullet wound are also on display.

IB Times reports a statement by the museum said, “[The Exhibition] explores what humans have done to brains in the cause of medical intervention, scientific enquiry, cultural meaning and technological change.”

According to Ken Arnold, head of public programs at Wellcome Collection, commenting on the exhibition themed on the human brain: “We all recognise its outline and know that it is the most important part of us, but for many, the brain remains as mysterious as it is beguiling. This exhibition presents brains of extraordinary people among other intriguing specimens and showcases remarkable tales from more than 500 years of scientific investigation into the physical matter of the mind.”

The human brain.

Gutenberg Encyclopedia
The human brain.

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Albert Einstein Short Biography

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 6, 2012

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Einstein Was Right All Along: ‘Faster-Than-Light’ Neutrino Was Product of Error

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 28, 2012

A discovery that could have upended a century of physics research was caused by a loose cable. Phew.
Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A woman passes behind layers of the world’s largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland on March 22, 2007.

The universe as we know it was saved today. The instrument of its salvation, and that of the very edifice of physics itself? A fiber-optic cable in a GPS receiver at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva.

The universe was first endangered back in September, when a group of CERN physicists fired a swarm of neutrinos — ghostly particles that don’t give a fig about objects in their path—through a mountain to a receiver beneath Italy’s Apennine Mountains, located 450 miles (724 km) away. Since the mountain might as well not have been there, the neutrinos should have moved at the speed of light the entire way — no slower, and definitely no faster, since, as Albert Einstein pointed out, nothing in the universe can do that.

(MORE: Was Einstein Wrong? A Faster-Than-Light Neutrino May Be Saying Yes)

But according to the Apennine receivers, the neutrinos did go faster — not by much, just by 60 nanoseconds, or .0025% of the time it would have taken a light beam to make the trip. But being a little faster than light is like being a little dead; even a tiny bit changes everything. In this case, what the experiment would have changed is the very foundation of Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which is itself the foundation of more than a century of physics, and fundamental to our entire understanding of the universe. So people were concerned. Read the rest of this entry »

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Einstein Was Right All Along: ‘Faster-Than-Light’ Neutrino Was Product of Error

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 22, 2012

A discovery that could have upended a century of physics research was caused by a loose cable. Phew.
Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A woman passes behind layers of the world’s largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland on March 22, 2007.

The universe as we know it was saved today. The instrument of its salvation, and that of the very edifice of physics itself? A fiber-optic cable in a GPS receiver at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva.

The universe was first endangered back in September, when a group of CERN physicists fired a swarm of neutrinos — ghostly particles that don’t give a fig about objects in their path—through a mountain to a receiver beneath Italy’s Apennine Mountains, located 450 miles (724 km) away. Since the mountain might as well not have been there, the neutrinos should have moved at the speed of light the entire way — no slower, and definitely no faster, since, as Albert Einstein pointed out, nothing in the universe can do that. Read the rest of this entry »

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