Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Asean’

Asia’s balance of power: China’s military rise

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 5, 2012

There are ways to reduce the threat to stability that an emerging superpower poses

NO MATTER how often China has emphasised the idea of a peaceful rise, the pace and nature of its military modernisation inevitably cause alarm. As America and the big European powers reduce their defence spending, China looks likely to maintain the past decade’s increases of about 12% a year. Even though its defence budget is less than a quarter the size of America’s today, China’s generals are ambitious. The country is on course to become the world’s largest military spender in just 20 years or so (see article).

Much of its effort is aimed at deterring America from intervening in a future crisis over Taiwan. China is investing heavily in “asymmetric capabilities” designed to blunt America’s once-overwhelming capacity to project power in the region. This “anti-access/area denial” approach includes thousands of accurate land-based ballistic and cruise missiles, modern jets with anti-ship missiles, a fleet of submarines (both conventionally and nuclear-powered), long-range radars and surveillance satellites, and cyber and space weapons intended to “blind” American forces. Most talked about is a new ballistic missile said to be able to put a manoeuvrable warhead onto the deck of an aircraft-carrier 2,700km (1,700 miles) out at sea. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

US mily to stay in Pacific to counter China: Panetta

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 26, 2011

Bali (Indonesia)—US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta assured anxious Asian allies that the U.S. will maintain its large military presence in the Pacific as a counterweight to China, despite mounting pressure at home to cut spending.

US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta at a news conference during the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Defence ministers’ meeting ion Indonesia’s resort island of Bali, on Sunday.

China’s military buildup and aggressive posture in the South China Sea has become a growing U.S. concern, officials say.

But in his first trip to Asia as Pentagon chief, Mr. Panetta appeared to tone down his rhetoric, praising Beijing’s muted response to a recent U.S. arms deal with Taiwan and voicing confidence that a closer bilateral relationship can be forged despite deep mistrust on both sides.

Mr. Panetta’s promise to “strengthen our presence in this part of the world” was part of what officials described as a “realignment” of U.S. interests.

As American forces withdraw from Iraq this year and Afghanistan by the end of 2014, the U.S. will be able to expand its diplomatic and military influence deeper into Southeast Asia and the Pacific, officials said. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

China’s Security Chief Goes on Tour—How Is Asia Reacting?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 24, 2011

Posted by 

Over the past week, as I’ve traveled across Asia, I’ve discovered an unlikely partner in my continental peregrinations:

China's Politburo Standing Committee Member Zhou Yongkang arrives for a meeting in Kathmandu, Nepal, August 17, 2011. (Photo: Navesh Chitrakar / Reuters)

China’s security chief Zhou Yongkang. The senior Chinese envoy’s travels have taken him to Nepal, Laos, Cambodia and Tajikistan. The final stop is Mongolia, where Zhou is expected to head on Tuesday.

In Zhou’s wake, the narrative has tended to follow the same plot-line: first, China’s state media proclaims “mutually beneficial cooperation” and “longstanding friendship” between Beijing and the local government. Then a raft of trade deals or bequeathing of military goodies is announced. Finally, an undercurrent of unease follows, with regional analysts wondering about China’s growing economic and security might.

Last Saturday, Zhou was in Cambodia, where he met with Prime Minister Hun Sen. In addition to various mining, road-construction and farming deals, China has agreed to supply nearly $200 million in helicopters to Cambodia. Beijing is already the Southeast Asian nation’s largest foreign investor, and Hun Sen, who has quietly evolved into one of Asia’s longest-serving strongmen, has been vociferous in his support of China. His enthusiasm for Chinese largesse stands in marked contrast to his feelings toward Western donors who tend to attach pesky strings like human-rights commitments to their aid. The Phnom Penh Post quoted a local researcher worrying that “Cambodia will become subservient to China.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Asia | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S.: Inverted Philippine Flag Was ‘Honest Mistake’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 27, 2010


For mistake, undoubtedly, apology is necessary. Well done! Good start. Apology could make great.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: