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Posts Tagged ‘Big Bang’

‘Cosmic Inflation’ Discovery Lends Key Support For Theory Of Expanding Early Universe (VIDEO)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 18, 2014

AP  | by  MALCOLM RITTER

NEW YORK (AP) — The universe was born almost 14 billion years ago, exploding into existence in an event called the Big Bang. Now researchers say they’ve spotted evidence that a split-second later, the expansion of the cosmos began with a powerful jump-start.

Experts called the discovery a major advance if confirmed by others. Although many scientists already believed that initial, extremely rapid growth spurt happened, finding this evidence has been a key goal in the study of the universe. Researchers reported Monday that they did it by peering into the faint light that remains from the Big Bang.

If verified, the discovery “gives us a window on the universe at the very beginning,” when it was far less than one-trillionth of a second old, said theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss of Arizona State University, who was not involved in the work. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tuning In to the Universe

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 26, 2013

By Honor Harger

Images of space are ubiquitous in our lives. We have been surrounded by stunning portrayals of our own solar system and beyond for generations. But in popular culture, we have no sense of what space sounds like. And indeed, most people associate space with silence.

2013-02-22-harger1.jpg
The spiral galaxy M106. Photo courtesy of NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), R. Gendler (for the Hubble Heritage Team), and G. Bacon (STScI).

There are, of course, perfectly valid scientific reasons for assuming so. Space is a vacuum. But through radio, we can listen to the Sun’s fizzling solar flares, the roaring waves and spitting fire of Jupiter’s stormy interactions with its moon Io, pulsars’ metronomic beats, or the eerie melodic shimmer of a whistler in the magnetosphere.

Radio waves emitted from celestial bodies can be turned into sound by ordinary radio receivers, which contain amplifiers and speakers that convert electrical signals into sound waves. Using this century-old process, the universe becomes soundful.

This is all possible due to the science of radio astronomy. The study of celestial phenomena at radio wavelengths, radio astronomy came into being after the accidental discovery of cosmic radiation by radio engineer, Karl Jansky in 1933. Whilst optical astronomers use telescopes to look at the visible light emitted by stars, radio astronomers use radio telescopes to detect radio waves.

Back in 2001, my artistic group, r a d i o q u a l i a, created Radio Astronomy to allow listeners to encounter different celestial frequencies, hearing planets, stars, nebulae, and the constant hiss of cosmic noise. The intention was to unearth the sonic character of objects in our universe, and in the process, perhaps make these phenomena more tangible and comprehensible. Radio enabled us to hear something which was physically present, but imperceptible to our senses, which as radio artists, appealed to us. Read the rest of this entry »

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‘Scientists understand only 4% of universe’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

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Interactive Panorama: Step Inside the Large Hadron Collider

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 16, 2012

 

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Above: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two main detectors at the LHC. It weighs 12,500 tons, measures 69 ft. (21 m) in length and is a key research tool for 2,000 scientists hailing from 37 countries. It was built above ground and lowered into place—a sensible strategy for so massive a piece of hardware. Here it is seen in 2008, just before it was completed. (Panorama by Peter McCready)

There’s something almost ironic about the disparity of scales between the Large Hadron Collider and the subatomic particles it’s built to study. The collider itself measures 17 mi. (27 km) in circumference, sits 380 ft. (116 m) below ground and cost $10 billion to build. Its detectors and magnets alone weigh tens of thousands of tons. As for the particles that are produced by the proton collisions that take place in the LHC tunnels? They are so tiny and evanescent that they flash into and out of existence in just a few trillionths of a second. But you can learn a lot in that flicker of time. Read the rest of this entry »

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Deepak Chopra, Michael Shermer, Chapman University

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 14, 2012

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The Supernatural (Edited Narrated and Directed by: Dhruba Adhikari)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 28, 2012

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A Review Of The Tree of Life — The Trials of Job and the Grace of Mary

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 1, 2012

 
By Deepak Chopra

Among the Oscar contenders this year, The Tree of Life stands out for inspiring awe and wonder. That was the intention, I’m sure, but audiences mostly express awe about the stupendous visuals, which depict the cosmos from the scale of an amoeba to the scale of the Big Bang. What’s gotten ignored is the spiritual argument that Terence Malick, the writer-director, clearly poses. It’s a very old argument but one that resists acceptable answers today.

Yet the entire story is about Jack’s spiritual confusion, because his Job-like father and his saintly mother stand at two poles. An Old Testament God pulls him one way, a New Testament God the other. The beauty of this dilemma, which could seem artificially schematic, is that it feels so American. Malick made an earlier film, The New World, that explicitly showed America as a land of rebirth, a new Eden. For him, as in all of his movies, the American dilemma is about that ideal beginning and where it has led us. Is it our role to find a special grace that the Old World cannot deliver? Or did the new land turn us into Mr. O’Brien, missing the glory of God because we are fixated on materialism?

I think The Tree of Life is serious enough to legitimately ask these deep questions and powerful enough to make us think about them. It would be fascinating to hear what other viewers feel. Read the rest of this entry »

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Stephen Hawking’s 70th birthday: 17 things you need to know about the physicist

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 8, 2012

Happy Birthday to Professor Stephen Hawking, who today celebrates his 70th birthday – nearly fifty years after he was first diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

Here are 17 things you need to know about the most famous theoretical physicist in the world.

1) Born in Oxford on January 8 1942 – 300 years after the death of astronomer Galileo Galilei – Professor Hawking grew up in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

2) After being diagnosed with a rare form of motor neurone disease – amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – at the age of 22, Hawking was given just a few years to live.

3) Hawking is as much a celebrity as he is a scientist, having appeared on The Simpsons, Star Trek and having provided narration for a British Telecom commercial that was later sampled on a Pink Floyd album.

4) He had a difficult time at the local public school and was persecuted as a “swot” who was more interested in jazz, classical music and debating than sport and pop. Read the rest of this entry »

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What Happened Before Creation?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 6, 2012

By Robert Lanza 

Everyone knows that something is screwy with the way we visualize the cosmos. Theories of its origins screech to a halt when they reach the very event of interest — the moment of creation, the “Big Bang.”

The current scientific model proposes that the universe is like a watch that somehow wound itself and that will unwind in a semi-predictable way. Life arose by an unknown process, and then proceeded to change form under Darwinian mechanisms that operate under these same physical rules. Life contains consciousness, but the latter is poorly understood and is, in any case, solely a matter for biologists.

But there’s a problem. Consciousness isn’t just an issue for biologists; it’s a problem for physics. Nothing in physics explains how molecules in your brain create consciousness. The beauty of a sunset, the miracle of love, the taste of a delicious meal — these are all mysteries to science. It can’t explain how consciousness arose from matter; our understanding of this basic phenomenon of our existence is nil. Not coincidentally, consciousness comes up again in a completely different realm of science. Quantum theory, while working well mathematically, makes no logical sense. As new experiments show, particles seem to behave as if they respond to a conscious observer. Because that can’t be right, physicists have deemed quantum theory inexplicable. The simplest explanation — that particles actually do interact with consciousness at some level — is too far outside the model to be seriously considered.

But even putting aside the issues of consciousness, the current model leaves much to be desired when it comes to explaining the universe. The cosmos sprang out of nothingness 13.7 billion years ago, in a titanic event humorously labeled the Big Bang. We don’t understand where it came from and we continually tinker with the details, including adding an inflationary period with physics we don’t yet understand. Read the rest of this entry »

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Chib(3P) Discovered: Large Hadron Collider Scientists Find New Subatomic Particle

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 22, 2011

Large Hadron Collider scientists including a group from the UK believe they have detected their first new subatomic particle.

Known as Chi (the Greek X symbol) b (3P), it is a “boson” like the fabled Higgs particle believed to underpin mass.

Chib(3P) provides a new way of combining two other elementary particles, the “beauty” quark and its antiquark, so that they bind together.
Quarks are the building blocks of protons and neutrons, which form the cores of atoms.

They come in six different “flavours” including “beauty”, also known as the “bottom” quark.
Unlike the hypothetical Higgs which is not made up of smaller particles, Chib(3P) combines two heavy objects via the same “strong” force that holds the atomic nucleus together.

What is thought to be a clear signal of the particle was found in data from Atlas, one of the Large Hadron Collider’s four huge detectors.

The £4 billion particle accelerator, dubbed the “Big Bang Machine”, fills a 27-kilometre circular tunnel that straddles the Swiss-French border near Geneva.

It is designed to recreate the conditions moments after the Big Bang that created the universe 13.7 billion years ago.
The new findings are published today in the online scientific archive arXiv.

Dr Miriam Watson, a member of the Collider team from the University of Birmingham, said: “The lighter partners of the Chib(3P) were observed around 25 years ago. Our new measurements are a great way to test theoretical calculations of the forces that act on fundamental particles, and will move us a step closer to understanding how the universe is held together.”

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Dark Matter, Darker Still: The Cosmos’ Greatest Mystery Deepens

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 27, 2011

By MICHAEL D. LEMONICK

The galaxy of Andromeda, the nearest large galaxy to our own, circa 1990 Space Frontiers / Hulton Archive / Getty Images

Like Hollywood legends Audrey Hepburn and Katharine Hepburn, dark energy and dark matter are completely unrelated, even though they share a name. Dark energy, a force that makes the universe expand faster and faster all the time, is called dark because it’s mysterious. Nobody knows what it is. Dark matter, on the other hand, a type of matter that outweighs ordinary stars and galaxies 5 to 1, is called dark because it’s utterly invisible. We know it’s there because its gravity yanks galaxies and stars around, but it neither emits nor reflects any light.

Both darks are a big deal in astronomy. The accelerating universe, the first evidence that dark energy exists, earned three physicists the Nobel Prize just a few weeks ago. But dark matter has somehow failed to impress the Nobel committee, even though the idea has been around a lot longer. In the 1930s, astronomer Fritz Zwicky first suggested that given how fast galaxies whip around in space, they ought to fly apart — and would, if there weren’t some invisible matter holding them gravitationally together. In the 1970s, physicists Vera Rubin and Kent Ford came in with stronger evidence for the existence of dark matter, but their work too was received with shrugs. Over time, however, dark matter has become an accepted part of modern astronomy — and now that it is, a new study, soon to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, is calling some of the fundamental assumptions about it into question.(Read about dark matter and how starburst galaxies are formed.)

The conventional wisdom since the early 1990s has been that dark matter consists of giant clouds of still undiscovered subatomic objects known as “weakly interacting massive particles,” or WIMPs (an example of astronomer humor that will undoubtedly appeal to fans of the Big Bang theory). Recently, astronomer Matt Walker of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and a colleague undertook a study of two dwarf galaxies hovering on the edges of the Milky Way, looking for new clues to the behavior of WIMPs — and came away questioning whether the particles were there at all. “Our results,” Walker says, “pose a real challenge to cold dark matter. I think it’s certainly a problem.” Read the rest of this entry »

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War of The Worldviews: Where Science and Spirituality Agree and Disagree

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 13, 2011

Leonard describes Einstein’s theory of relativity, and quantum theory, and how they are combined to create a scientific theory of how the universe began and evolved. He describes the impressive agreement between the theoretical predictions based on this picture and actual observations of the heavens made by astronomers. Deepak proposes a creative first cause that preceded the infinitesimally brief Planck epoch (10-43 seconds) following the Big Bang. He suggests that since the laws of nature and perhaps space and time emerged after the Planck epoch, any understanding of the pre-created universe remains outside the scope of objective science.

 

It is said that real spiritual world starts when science ends. According to this science and real spiritual world can not go together.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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A Cosmic Book With Human Insight

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 13, 2011

By Deepak Chopra

I found my eyes opened, along with my mind, by an intriguing book, The View from the Center of the Universe, by Joel R. Primack, a distinguished physicist at the University of California Santa Cruz, and his wife, Nancy Ellen Abrams, an excellent writer. There have been a spate of books extending our concept of the universe and how human beings fit into it. In an earlier post I listed some of the most exciting concepts that are potentially revolutionizing cosmology, among them, that we live in a conscious universe, that the universe is a living thing, and that evolution drives the cosmos. Primack and Abrams continue to explore such ideas in their newest bookThe New Universe and the Human Future.

But they also campaign persuasively for a meaningful universe, contending that we no longer live in the ancient or medieval conception of the cosmos and not the empty, meaningless universe of Newton. “The lack of a meaningful universe is a modern mental handicap.” They are not aiming to reclaim old religious ideas, however. “There is a real dissonance between the colorful, volatile, science-expanded world we actually inhabit and the monotonously recycled language that religions use to describe ‘ultimate reality.'” So what kind of meaning do Primack and Abrams find in the cosmos? Their book answers this question through a totally engaging and very readable exploration of “the new universe” explained by quantum physics and contemporary astrophysics.

In a nutshell, “… the Big Bang powers us all, galaxies and human beings alike, in different ways on our respective size-scales.” This last phrase refers to how nature operates differently depending on how big or small the scale is, moving from the subatomic to the universal. Primack and Abrams put great store in the unique scale of the human world and how our minds have turned to explain ourselves as well as the cosmos. They continue, “Every one of us is entitled to say, ‘I am what the expanding universe is doing here and now.'” This startling declaration isn’t solipsism. In fact, it echoes a sentence I remember from a noted Indian guru, who said, “You need to realize that the entire universe collaborated to create this exact second and everything that is happening to you right now.” Bringing such a perspective into practical life, as Primack and Abrams want to do, is not easy. Read the rest of this entry »

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Large Hadron Collider (LHC) generates a ‘mini-Big Bang’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 8, 2010

By Katia Moskvitch Science reporter, BBC News

The Large Hadron Collider has successfully created a “mini-Big Bang” by smashing together lead ions instead of protons.

The scientists working at the enormous machine on Franco-Swiss border achieved the unique conditions on 7 November.

The experiment created temperatures a million times hotter than the centre of the Sun.

The LHC is housed in a 27km-long circular tunnel under the French-Swiss border near Geneva.

Up until now, the world’s highest-energy particle accelerator – which is run by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Cern) – has been colliding protons, in a bid to uncover mysteries of the Universe’s formation. Read the rest of this entry »

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Big Bang versus Little Pop

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 14, 2010

Each government on our planet today is desperate to get/grab anything that belongs to the “unexplained”, to UFOs, or to any technological or historical secrets. Fact is, “desperate” is not the right word; they are capable of ANYTHING to get those artifacts, secrets, whatever. The idea is, each country/nation strives to achieve “technological supremacy” and “absolute power”. From social-psychology point of view, that behavior is understandable. The troublesome aspect is the official propaganda: there are no unexplained things, there are no UFOs, and technological/historical secrets do not exist; everything is just ordinary and normal.Well, that “natural” social mentality is due to a very low “real average social intelligence” existing today in our societies, everywhere. It is possible in about 100 years from this time one country on our planet will achieve that “total technological supremacy”, therefore it will enslave all other nations. If that moment will become reality, people are going to discover that technological power is not sufficient; better said, technological power is far from anything. If you have little patience, you may discover what is way, way more powerful and important than technology is in these Amazing Articles in in our SF books.

As a note, we do not try to sell anything to anyone. If you want to learn, that is just fine with us, and we can help; if you like to “play”, our advice to you is, do it as hard as you can, forever!

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It is not easy to decide on the most interesting topic for a first article. Anyway, after many painful sacrifices, we settled for the birth of our Universe: the great Big Bang itself! The Big-Bang theory started spreading among the scientists at the beginning of the twentieth century, after the English translation of the Sanskrit Veda poems was published in 1899. Read the rest of this entry »

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