Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Britain’

Nepali Origin Aruna Gurung bags Hong kong’s Chief Executive Award.

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 5, 2012

Hong Kong Government honor Mrs. Aruna Gurung with ‘Chief Executive Commendation for Community Service Award” for her significant contribution to community service in occasion of 15th Anniversary Day of Hong Kong Handed over to China by Britain.

This award will handed over to Aruna in National Day of Hong Kong, October 1st by President of the Executive Council of Hong Kong.

Nepali Origin Aruna Gurung is working as In-flight Service Manager in Dragon Air Hong Kong. Gurung has been actively engaged in social work for a decade now. Aruna Said Working in these social service organization she will not get an salary or any allowances.

Hong Kong Government has also nominated her Recently for 2 years as Member of Committee of “Yao Chi Mong South Asia Committee” where lots of Nepali Community residing where she is expected to promote social harmony. Read the rest of this entry »

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Buried Treasure: World War II Spitfires to Be Unearthed in Burma

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 23, 2012

Paging Indiana Jones: a British farmer’s 15-year quest to find a squadron of legendary fighter planes buried in a far-off land has finally paid off
Michael Dunning/Getty Images

MICHAEL DUNNING/GETTY IMAGES
Spitfire aircraft in flight

It’s like something out of an Indiana Jones film, if you take away the religious overtones and ophidiophobic adventurer. After 15 years, a British farmer’s quest to find a squadron of legendary fighter planes lost in Burma during World War II has finally paid off.

Lincolnshire farmer David Cundall, 62, has spent about $207,000, traveled to Burma a dozen times and negotiated with the cagey Burmese government, all in the hopes of finding a stash of iconic British Spitfires buried somewhere in the Southeast Asian country.

(PHOTOS: Burma’s Landmark Elections and Aung San Suu Kyi’s Path to Victory)

Buried planes? It sounds odd, but in fact this was fairly common toward the end of the war; as the conflict wound down and jet aircraft promised to make propeller-driven fighters obsolete, many aircraft were scrapped, buried or sunk by Allied Forces in order to prevent them from falling into enemy hands.

(PHOTOS: Europe Then and Now)

Cundall started his search after his friend heard from a group of U.S. veterans that they had stashed Spitfires in the region. “We’ve done some pretty silly things in our time, but the silliest was burying Spitfires,” the veterans said. Read the rest of this entry »

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Some Hot Clips of the Day

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 20, 2012

‘Ron Paul right, US deep into fascism’

What’s My Debt, Dad? ‘Greece left to beg for pocket money’

Invincible Me: Israel drums up for Iran strike

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Strengthening the UN’s Ability to Maintain International Peace and Security

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 15, 2012

By Lawrence Wittner

Conservative politicians often portray the United Nations as a powerful monster, poised to gobble up the United States and other countries and put them under alien rule.

The reality, of course, is quite different. When it comes to international peace and security, the United Nations is notably lacking in power. Its resolutions along these lines are often ignored or go unenforced. Frequently, they are not even adopted. This situation leaves nations free to pursue traditional practices of power politics and, occasionally, much worse.

The weakness of the United Nations was illustrated once again on February 4, when Russia and China joined forces to veto a UN Security Council resolution dealing with Syria. The resolution was designed to halt eleven months of bloodshed in that nation, where more than 5,400 people had been massacred, mostly by government military forces. Backing an Arab League plan for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step aside, the resolution was supported by 13 members of the Security Council. But, with Security Council rules allowing even one great power to veto action, the resolution was defeated. Read the rest of this entry »

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Iran: Cameron, Merkel And Sarkozy Demand Regime Ends Nuclear Ambitions

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 23, 2012

David Cameron, Angela Merkel and Nicolas Sarkozy have issued a statement amid EU oil sanctions imposed against Iran today.

The move comes after Britain joined the United States and France in sending a flotilla of warships through the sensitive Strait of Hormuz as tensions escalate of over the regime’s controversial nuclear programme.

The statement said: “Today, the EU agreed an unprecedented package of sanctions on Iran, including a full ban on Iranian oil exports.

“Our message is clear. We have no quarrel with the Iranian people. But the Iranian leadership has failed to restore international confidence in the exclusively peaceful nature of its nuclear programme. We will not accept Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon. Iran has so far had no regard for its international obligations and is already exporting and threatening violence around its region.

“We call on Iran’s leadership immediately to suspend its sensitive nuclear activities and abide fully by its international obligations. The door is open to Iran to engage in serious and meaningful negotiations about its nuclear programme. Until Iran comes to the table, we will be united behind strong measures to undermine the regime’s ability to fund its nuclear programme, and to demonstrate the cost of a path that threatens the peace and security of us all.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Iran: Flotilla Of Warships Sent Through Strait of Hormuz Heightens Tensions

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 23, 2012

Britain has joined the United States and France in sending a flotilla of warships through the sensitive Strait of Hormuz in a pointed message to the Iranian regime.

The Ministry of Defence confirmed that a Royal Navy Type 23 frigate, HMS Argyll, was part of the US-led carrier group to pass through the waterway, as tensions continued to escalate over Tehran’s nuclear programme.

The strait, a 34-mile-wide sea passage, connects the petroleum-producing Persian Gulf states to the ocean, making it a strategic choke point on the world’s economy.

The EU gave preliminary approval to new sanctions against Iranian oil on Monday. On the table is a total ban on European purchases of Iranian oil – a sanction that would not just hit Iran but key EU buyers including Greece Italy and Spain.

Sanctions are already expected against Iran’s central bank.

The full implementation of the sanctions would be delayed until 1 July, due to concerns about their impact on the European economy.

The UK, Germany, France and the Netherlands had been leading calls for nothing more than a three-month delay before the sanctions bite, but Greece, which fears its economic woes will worsen if it cannot find alternative suppliers at Iran-style preferential rates – has urged a much longer phase-in to ease the pain.

The embargo is yet to be formally approved by the EU nations’ foreign ministers, who are meeting in Brussels.

In response to the expected sanctions the Iranians have threatened to close the strait – through which 35% of the world’s tanker-borne oil exports pass – in retaliation. Read the rest of this entry »

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Double-Dip Recession Will Hit Britain, Says OECD

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 28, 2011

Britain’s economy will fall back into recession according to a forecast from the OECD.

Unemployment will rise and weak demand for exports coupled with the government’s cuts will hurt growth in the fourth quarter of 2011 and the first of 2012, according to the economic think-tank.

But despite the gloomy double-dip prediction the OECD said the recession will be “mild” and said the government policy had “bolstered credibility and helped maintain low bond yields”.

The OECD’s chief economist Pier Carlo Padoan said the ongoing eurozone crisis was a “key risk to the world economy”.

Chancellor George Osborne, reacting to the figures on Monday morning said he believed the public were still behind the coalition’s austerity measures despite the predictions: “They have had enough of politicians who think there is a quick-fix solution, who say you can borrow a bit more to get us out of debt. As a result, actually I think the public is behind what the Government is doing.”

But shadow chancellor Ed Balls said the forecasts would concern “hard-pressed families and pensioners”.

“They suggest our economy will continue to flatline, or worse, well into next year and that unemployment will rise even higher. And with our recovery choked off over twelve months ago, they show that the UK will grow more slowly than the eurozone or the USA this year.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Whither the European (Dis)Union?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 14, 2011

by 

Is significantly greater integration the surest way to prevent both the euro and even the entire European Union from

A droplet of water falls from a tap in front of the euro sculpture at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Friday, Nov.11, 2011. (Photo: Michael Probst / AP)

blowing apart? Or is EU federation–and the basic powers national governments now wield being weakened in the process–exactly the kind of radical fusion certain to send countries jealous of their sovereignty fleeing for the exits? As euro zone members now consider drastic, big-bang solutions to overcoming their currency’s crisis, leaders of all 27 EU member states find themselves grappling with the question of whether more or less Europe is necessary to safeguard the bloc’s future.

The spread of the single currency’s existential crisis–which began as a debt problem initially believed to imperil only a few small nations before expanding to shake Europe’s biggest economies to their foundations–mirrors the rising pressure posed by a similarly essential dilemma over the wider European Union project, and evoking similar denial from leaders. While most officials agree that deep and dramatic measures must be undertaken to finally contain the debt-driven euro emergency, their concord evaporates over the different options for action—especially centralization of budget and debt rules, and giving real intervention power to the European Central Bank. Central to that disagreement are clashing views over just how bound together EU members should be—a long-standing confrontation between Euroenthusiasts and Euroskeptics that has resurged in crisis anew. As such, moves to save the euro will probably shape the direction—or even future—of the entire EU as it seek a collective horizon to look toward.

News reports Nov. 10 stated France and Germany were consulting partners on potentially radical harmonization measures between euro zone members—or at least those capable of and willing to accept far stricter budgetary and fiscal rules that greater convergence would involve. If true, it suggests the euro zone’s two biggest economies are contemplating tossing unsustainably indebted currency partners out of what would become a smaller, tighter euro ship. German Chancellor Angela Merkel denied those reports, insisting scission of the euro 17 wasn’t an option. Yet her comments elsewhere indicated the status quo could not endure, either. Read the rest of this entry »

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Hurricane Katia claims first victim as it heads to Britain

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 12, 2011

A satellite image of Hurricane Katia (Pic: AFP/NASA)

Hurricane Katia has claimed its first reported victim as it heads for Britain.

Thomas Clarke, 33, was struck by a “huge” wave and swept out to sea on Friday.

Rescuers retrieved his camera bag and shoes but his body could not be found.

Winds of up to 80mph are expected to cause disruption to northern England and Scotland when the storm arrives here today.

Last night 30ft waves were battering the west coast of Ireland.

Mr Clarke, of County Cavan, Northern Ireland, was swept away in Maine, US. He was visiting America for a friend’s wedding.

Billy Payne, forecaster for MeteoGroup, said last night: “There is potential for damage, especially with trees, and the winds will be strong enough to cause some structural problems.”

high winds will be accompanied by heavy rain and the Environment Agency has issued several flood alerts for inland and coastal areas.

An alert – which warns that flooding is possible – has been issued along the North Sea coast in Yorkshire between Bridlington and Barmston with people being told to be aware of overtopping spray and waves at high tide. Read the rest of this entry »

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Gaddafi Regime Condemns UK For Recognising Libyan Rebel Council

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 28, 2011


There is no compromise­. Each side going in own way and, hence; nothing strange.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Bhanu Jayanti: Poetry recitation via Skype

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 16, 2011

HIMALAYAN NEWS SERVICE

ABERDEEN: The Organisation for Nepalis Culture and Welfare (ONCW) at Aberdeen, Scotland organised a poetry recitation programme through Skype on July 13. Poets from eight different countries recited their poem via Skype at the event organised to mark the 198th birth anniversary of Aadikavi Bhanu Bhakta Acharya.

According to a press release issued by the organisers, Byakul Maila, the creator of Nepali national anthem recited his poem via Skype live from Nepal. Meanwhile renowned Irish poet Kayal O’ Cerkayal recited poems of Nepali poet Bhupi Sherchan in Nepali, English and Irish. The press release quotes Cerkayal, “The literary works of Bhanu Bhakta, Laxmi Prasad Devkota, Gopal Prasad Rimal and Parijat should be promoted at the international level.”

Dr Kavita Ram Shrestha, Ram Kumar Shrestha and Durga Pokharel from Britain, Sailendra Sakar, Gyanendra Gadal, Gita Khatri and Puranaghare from America, Madhu Madhurya from Russia, Jagat Navodit from Italy, Brejesh Gautam from Denmark and Bishwodeep Tigela from Brunei were other poets who recited poems via Skype. Dipesh Regmi, the president of ONCW committed to promote the Nepali art, culture and literature in coming days as well. The programme that continued for almost three hours was screened using a projector.

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Hidden History of Nepal

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 6, 2011

This is an English translation of excerpt from the book called Nepal Geschenk der Götter(Nepal gifts of the Gods) -> written in German language

Since 1716, Gorakh Nath Narbhupal Shah had been sitting on his throne made of mud. He found his throne very uncomfortable, and wanted to change it with the silver throne of the Kathmandu Valley at any cost.

With this aim in mind , he married many times to widen his territory and built alliances. But he was not successful .Finally , he changed his tactics.In 1732, he sent his 10 years old son Prithvi Narayan to stay with the king of Bhaktapur.

In a covering letter, Narbhupal Shah requested the king of Bhaktapur to raise his son and provide him a good education which was only possible in Nepal.
But his real intention was to place his son in the palace so that he could spy on it and gather vital information.

The Malla king of Bhaktapur took in his young guest Prithvi Narayan Shah with friendship and showed him the prince of Gorkha.Prithvi Narayan Shah had an excellent memory , and remembered everything that he saw.

After five years, he returned to his hometown Gorkha. He had gathered much information about the reasons behind the quarrels among the valley kings, the exact quantity of military equipments and the strategic locations in Nepal.

Prithvi Narayan Shah was sure that he could conquer the pass of Nuwakot, so in the same year he sent his Gorkha soldiers to attack Nuwakot. The young prince had miscalculated or his father had underistimated the Mallas. The Malla kings banded together and their armies beat the Gorkhas very badly. Read the rest of this entry »

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Queen Elizabeth II Becomes Britain’s Second-Longest Reigning Monarch

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 12, 2011


She is still very healthy and could be the first.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Queen Elizabeth Celebrates 85th Birthday, Hands Out Bags of Money

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 21, 2011

By: WILLIAM LEE ADAMS

Move over Kate Middleton. Today is all about Her Majesty the Queen.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth holds on to her hat in high winds, during her visit to her grandson, Prince William, at RAF Valley, in north Wales April 1, 2011.

Thursday afternoon, Elizabeth, accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, will conduct the Church of England’s Maundy Services in Westminster Abbey. To mark Maundy Thursday—the day before Good Friday—she’ll distribute small bags of money to 85 male and 85 female retirees—one for each of her 85 years. The symbolic alms come in either a red or white purse. The former includes a £5 coin commemorating the Prince Philip’s 90th birthday in June, and a 50-pence coin marking the 2012 London Olympic Games. The latter is stuffed with Maundy Money of silver coins, minted especially for the occasion, in one, two, three and four penny denominations. They various coins add up to the Queen’s age.

(More on TIME.com: See pictures of Queen Elizabeth’s most stunning tiaras)

Of course, as the head of Great Britain and the Commonwealth, the Queen doesn’t just have one birthday—she has two. Thursday is her actual birthday—she was born at 1926 at 17 Bruton Street, her grandfather’s former home which is now an upscale Chinese restaurant. But the U.K. officially celebrates her birthday on the third Saturday of June, owing to a tradition started by King Edward VIII. His birthday was in November—not the best time for a street party—so he schedule a second, more festive affair for the summer. Read the rest of this entry »

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Defense Secretary Robert Gates Says Arming And Training Of Libya Rebels Should Be Role Of Other Countries, Not U.S.

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 1, 2011


Nuclear power was developed in the name of establishi­ng peace and now this is threatenin­g the whole human race. Current existing amounts of nuclear power are enough to destroy not a single earth but dozens of equivalent earths. What will happen if the nuclear power will get into terrorists­’ hand? This is today’s one of the biggest concerns for world leaders. : http://ram­kshrestha.­wordpress.­com/2011/0­3/27/overc­oming-new-­decade-cha­llenges/
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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