Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Gandhi’

Tidbits of Nepali Journalism ‘’Buddha was born in ……..’’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 6, 2014

By Chiranjibi Paudyal

Chiranjibi-PaudyalThat evening, Indian Defence minister Fernandes haBuddha born in Nepald hosted a reception in honour of the participants of the conference. When I met in the reception, he was little bit furious and adamant to his statement. We had arguments. I said ‘Buddha was born in Nepal’ but he said ‘Buddha was born in India.’ I asked him ‘’who told you and how did you know Buddha was born in India’’, he said me ‘’had read since his childhood that Buddha was born in Northern India.’’ I told him if you read UN documents then you will know the real fact. I was so infuriated that I said little bit loudly: ‘’ Do you know ‘’U Thant?’’ You should know UN Secretary General from Asia? Then he said ‘’ Why not.’’

So you must be aware that there is UN project in Lumbini which is in Nepal since the time of U Thant. When I repeatedly said UN Project then he seemed to be convinced, and felt embarrassed. I arranged an interview with him for next morning in the same hotel where we were staying. When we sat for interview, I asked the same question to him like a teacher repeatedly asks a same question to a weak student. Later he corrected saying ‘Buddha was born in Nepal.’

Famous poet Sir Edwin Arnold to UN official say Buddha was born in India distorting the fact and hurting the sentiment of millions of Nepali around the globe. However, I had the opportunity to persuade a senior UN official to make him understand and acknowledge that ‘’ Gautam Buddha was born in Nepal.’’ Read the rest of this entry »

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‘Kissinger Cables’ Offer Window Into Indian Politics of the 1970s

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 9, 2013

By NEHA THIRANI BAGRI
Indira Gandhi, then Indian prime minister, at the site of India's first underground nuclear test in Pokhran, Rajasthan, in Dec. 1974.ReutersIndira Gandhi, then Indian prime minister, at the site of India’s first underground nuclear test in Pokhran, Rajasthan, in Dec. 1974.
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The “Kissinger Cables,” a collection of U.S. diplomatic cables released on Monday by WikiLeaks, contain some fascinating revelations about the political scenario in India in the 1970s. Here are the five great insights about India in the WikiLeaks release:

India’s first nuclear test was possibly motivated by political considerations:

According to this cable, sent from New Delhi to the Department of State, India’s first nuclear test on May 18, 1974, was motivated by domestic politics. The cable says that the nuclear test had been done at a time when the Indian government was tackling an economic slowdown, increasing discontent and rising political unrest.

“We are inclined to believe that this general domestic gloom and uncertainty weighed significantly in the balance of India’s nuclear decision,” reads the cable sent on the date of the nuclear test. “The need for a psychological boost, the hope of recreated atmosphere of exhilaration and nationalism that swept the country after 1971 – contrary to our earlier expectation – may have tipped the scales.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Nobel Prize: A tale of ignoble peace laureates

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 11, 2012

One man introduced indefinite detention and expanded the deadly global drone war. Another was the architect of the deliberate mass killing of civilian populations in Indochina. What do they have in common? Both are Nobel Peace laureates.

Gandhi never got one. Al Gore did. In one of the stranger ironies befitting of both Kafka and Orwell, sometimes the makers of permanent war are awarded for bringing temporary peace. Sometimes they don’t even get that far.

With the winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize set to be announced in Oslo, Norway on Friday, the shadow of Barack Obama still looms large. In 2009, the committee awarded the current US president “for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.” Nominations for the award are due by February 1, meaning Obama had served as America’s executive for less than two weeks when the Norwegian Nobel Committee selected him. Perhaps it was wishful thinking.

Since then, Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act into law, making it legal to indefinitely detain US citizens. There are also the deadly drone wars in Yemen and Pakistan, the war waged in Libya, the Afghan surge and a secret “kill list” revealed this year by The New York Times, which grants a select few American officials the option to mark perceived national security threats – foreign citizens or otherwise – for assassination. Ironic, yes, but they never could have known.  Read the rest of this entry »

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When There Is Peace Among Religions

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 26, 2012

By Steve McSwain,  Author, Speaker, Executive Coach…and, the Voice for the Spiritual but Not Religious

 Comment: Religion is religion if it unites people, religion is not religion if it divides people and that is the politics in the name of religion because the basic of every religion is the same:

Slightly over a year ago, I picked up my iPad one morning and began drawing the image you see in this post. I named it the Unity pendant. I designed this to be a kind of “brand” for my speaking and coaching on matters related to spirituality and interfaith acceptance and cooperation — even theinterfaith comedy show a Jewish friend and a professional comedian, Mark Klein, and I have created. I have long felt that the Dalai Lama is right when he said, “When there’s peace among religions, there will be peace in the world.” I had those words inscribed on the outer rims of the pendant.

It’s true — embarrassingly true. Many of the conflicts between nations, peoples and cultures throughout history have been motivated and sustained by religion and religious differences. Virtually all religions start out well but it isn’t long before a kind of collective ego takes over and things get insane. I’ve written extensively about what goes wrong in most religions, Christianity notwithstanding, in the book, “The Enoch Factor: The Sacred Art of Knowing God“: Read the rest of this entry »

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Mahatma Gandhi Reportedly Depicted As Bisexual, Racist In New Biography

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 1, 2011


Anything could be right, everything could be wrong.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Buddhism and Activism: How Would Sid Produce Social Change?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 9, 2011

But there must not be confusion that Buddha was born in Nepal: http://wor­ldamity.wo­rdpress.co­m/2010/02/­14/nepal%E2%80%99s­-lumbini-b­uddhas-bor­thplace/ or http://ram­kshrestha.­wordpress.­com/2010/0­7/10/472/. Due to India’s fake Lumbini, lots of people from the world are misinforme­d and every year thousands of misinforme­d tourists are taken to the fake Lumbini. From Human Rights point of view also this is crime as they are misinforme­d and taken to Buddha’s fake birth place.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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