Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Germany’

Participate in UNAEAUSTRALIA NEPALESE IDOL 2013

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 21, 2013

Idol series, one of several television shows that give formerly unknown persons an opportunity to become stars. The Idol series began in the United Kingdom and has since spread around the world – AustraliaSingaporeCanadaFranceGermanyIndia, the United StatesDenmarkNorwaythe NetherlandsFinlandSwedenSouth AfricaWest African countriesIndonesia, and many other countries. Japanese idol, a heavily promoted and merchandised singer or actor,a model that will later heavily influence the conception of “Idol” in Other Asian countries Pop Culture (Such as: Hong Kong,South KoreaTaiwanSingapore …).

Simon Cowell was given the role of judge on the first series of Pop Idol in the UK by then ITV Controller of Entertainment Claudia Rosencrantz in 2001, he was then judge on the first season of American Idol in 2002. With his notoriously critical reputation, Cowell is likened to TV personalities such as Judith Sheindlin and Anne Robinson. Cowell also appeared on the one-off World Idol programme in 2003, where it became clear that each country’s version of the Idol had attempted to come up with its own “Simon Cowell” type personality. In 2003, Cowell placed No 33 on Channel 4‘s list of the all-time 100 Worst Britons. Cowell’s S Records signed the top two finishers of the first season of Pop IdolWill Young and Gareth Gates, both of whom went on to have No 1 UK hits. Efforts begun in 2001 materialised in 2004, when Cowell returned to his group manufacturing roots with his latest brainchild, the internationally successful operatic pop group Il Divo, consisting of three opera singers and one pop singer of four different nationalities. Inspired by the success of Il Divo, Simon created a child version, Angelis, beating competition from many similar groups emerging at Christmas 2006.

On 11 January 2010, Cowell’s exit from American Idol was made official. The 2010 season was Cowell’s last on the show. It was also announced that FOX had acquired the rights to The X Factor USA, an American version of Cowell’s popular British show, The X Factor, which began in September 2011.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

G-8 or G-Zero? Why the West No Longer Sets the Global Agenda

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 20, 2012

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

MARK WILSON / GETTY IMAGES
G8 foreign ministers (L-R), Koichiro Gemba of Japan, Guido Westerwelle of Germany, Sergei Lavrov of Russia, British Foreign Secretary William Hague, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Alain Juppe of France, John Baird of Canada, Giulio Terzi Di Sant’Agata of Italy, and Catherine Ashton of the European Union, pose for a group photo on April 11, 2012 in Washington, DC. Secretary Clinton hosted this year’s G8 Foreign Ministers conference at the Blair House

The spectacle of some of the most powerful leaders in the world gathering at Camp David on Friday for the G-8 summit and then for this weekend’s NATO anniversary in Chicago won’t disguise the fact that things seem to be gradually falling apart. These once mighty symbols of international leadership appear almost paralyzed before the tides of economic, financial and political change. The opening of William Butler Yeats’ 1921 poem that found the best devoid of conviction and the worst filled with passionate intensity reads as if crafted as an elegant introduction to an analysis of the global political moment.

(MORE: The G8 Summit at Camp David: This Time, It’s Important)

The G-8 convenes as the euro zone is threatening to unravel, most immediately in the showdown over Germany’s insistence that Greece either swallow the toxic austerity medicine that could kill its economy or see itself banished from the euro zone, potentially triggering global financial losses on the order of $1 trillion. But the forum is unlikely to settle the fate of Greece, much less the underlying tension over policies of austerity to cut spending debt and stimulus policies to revive growth.

When the G-7 was founded in the 1980s its goal was to gather the leaders of the world’s most successful, dynamic economies to plot pathways to further prosperity. Russia was later added to its guest list as a reward for casting off communism rather than as a vote of confidence in its economy. But today, confidence in the group is low. Few seem to believe that the leaders of the U.S., Japan, Germany, France, Britain, Italy and Canada are equipped to tackle the problems facing the world economy. (They effectively admitted their limitations in 2008 when a far wider forum, the Group of 20 — which included the major emerging economies such as China, India, Brazil, Turkey and others — to tackle the global financial meltdown.) Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Euro – Going From Bad to Worse

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 27, 2012

By Sir Christopher Meyer, Former British Ambassador to the United States and Germany, former Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission

The markets have steadied a bit after their loss of nerve on Monday. But you can’t help feeling that it is a bit like a climber, sliding down a glacier to his inevitable doom, who breaks his fall for a while on a crumbling ledge that soon will give way.

Things in Euroland have taken a bad turn for the worse – and it’s the politics, stupid. It is not just the uncertainty about the second round of French presidential elections on 6 May. François Hollande, the Socialist leader, will probably win, because it will be easier for him than for Nicolas Sarkozy to pick up votes from those whose candidates were knocked out in the first round. But the energetic Sarko should never be underestimated. He is pitching his campaign hard to gain votes from the hard Right supporters of Marine Le Pen. Herein lies the problem for the euro and for Germany.

It almost doesn’t matter who wins the election. The fiscal compact agreed in principle by 25 out of 27 European leaders in January – “a kind of German straitjacket for the fiscally wayward”, to quote Stephen King, group chief economist of HSBC – is Angela Merkel’s pride and joy, her answer to all the eurozone’s difficulties. Typically, like the euro itself, it has been designed to make everyone more like Germany. Hollande has already made it a plank of his campaign to renegotiate the compact. Meanwhile, as Sarkozy moves ever rightwards, striking a strongly nationalist tone (and risking the estrangement of centrist voters), he puts himself increasingly at odds with a compact designed to create greater fiscal union on German terms. If Sarko wins, it is hard to see how Merkozy, never the warmest of unions, can simply pick up where they left off. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Why Qatari Owners of Paris’ Soccer Team Hanker For Aging Englishman Beckham

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 22, 2011

By BRUCE CRUMLEY

Los Angeles Galaxy's David Beckham fights for the ball against Emelio "Chieffy" Caligdong of the Philippines national football team Azkals during their friendly match at the Rizal Memorial football stadium in Manila December 3, 2011.

Why does perennially under-performing Paris Saint-Germain of France’s anemic professional soccer league see hiring a fading star at over $1 million per month as vital to assuring its future? Because the aging player in question is David Beckham, whose marketing and financial allure is considered as important as his footballing skill by PSG’s Qatari owners. And even if Beckham’s representatives are denying reports that the Los Angeles Galaxy midfielder has come to an unofficial agreement with PSG, there are reasons to suspect the resurgent rumors may yet come to fruition. After all, the Paris club is only one part of a mix with which Qatari VIPs are looking to boost the Emirate’s prestige through the world’s most popular sport. And despite his advancing age and slowing gait, Beckham remains not only one of the biggest global draws in the game—but just the kind of meta-star capable of mesmerizing celebrity-crazed, sports-fickle inhabitants of Paris.

French media was again abuzz Wednesday with reports that the 36-year-old Beckham has agreed to sign an 18-month contract with PSG once his Galaxy deal expires Dec. 31. According to dailies le Parisien and l’Equipe, Beckham has accepted a league-topping $1.05 million monthly salary whose total value could be nearly doubled by $22.3 million in performance bonuses—most of those based on Beckham’s merchandizing potential, rather than footballing potency. Indeed, in addition to Beckham’s iconic and hunk status that’s expected to broaden PSG’s appeal to a far wider base of Parisians (a population infamous as fair weather fans who demand big matches, lots of glitz, and the likelihood of victory to even start caring much about sports), the association with the former England hero might well allow Paris Saint-German to finally establish a true brand identity abroad. And that, it’s hoped, could mean millions in new income from PSG jerseys selling alongside the likes of Liverpool, Bayern Munich, and Barcelona merchandize in foreign markets–particularly in Beckham-mad Asia. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Russia to support India’s bid for permanent UNSC seat

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 16, 2011

Russia's President Dmitry Medvedev and India's Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (RIA Novosti / Vladimir Rodionov)

Russia will back India’s bid for permanent membership of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) if a decision to expand the body is made, President Dmitry Medvedev has said.

The Russian leader said that Moscow considers India “a strong, and real” candidate for joining the body as a permanent member.

The statement was made Medvedev’s joint conference with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh after their talks in the Russian capital.

“India is a privileged partner for us,” Medvedev pointed out. He stressed that “all UN countries should agree and reform the Security Council according to a jointly approved scenario.”

“There is no need for India to doubt Russia’s support,” Medvedev assured Singh, as cited by Interfax.

Currently, there are five permanent members with veto power in the UNSC – China, France, Russia, the UK and the US. Ten other members of the body are elected once every two years.

An expansion of the council – which was established back in 1946, shortly after WWII – has been discussed for years now. Many agree that it is time to reform the UNSC, since the world has changed a lot and so have the challenges that the international community faces. Several countries are now seeking permanent seats on the council, including the so-called G4 group, comprised of India, Japan, Germany and Brazil. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Whither the European (Dis)Union?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 14, 2011

by 

Is significantly greater integration the surest way to prevent both the euro and even the entire European Union from

A droplet of water falls from a tap in front of the euro sculpture at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Friday, Nov.11, 2011. (Photo: Michael Probst / AP)

blowing apart? Or is EU federation–and the basic powers national governments now wield being weakened in the process–exactly the kind of radical fusion certain to send countries jealous of their sovereignty fleeing for the exits? As euro zone members now consider drastic, big-bang solutions to overcoming their currency’s crisis, leaders of all 27 EU member states find themselves grappling with the question of whether more or less Europe is necessary to safeguard the bloc’s future.

The spread of the single currency’s existential crisis–which began as a debt problem initially believed to imperil only a few small nations before expanding to shake Europe’s biggest economies to their foundations–mirrors the rising pressure posed by a similarly essential dilemma over the wider European Union project, and evoking similar denial from leaders. While most officials agree that deep and dramatic measures must be undertaken to finally contain the debt-driven euro emergency, their concord evaporates over the different options for action—especially centralization of budget and debt rules, and giving real intervention power to the European Central Bank. Central to that disagreement are clashing views over just how bound together EU members should be—a long-standing confrontation between Euroenthusiasts and Euroskeptics that has resurged in crisis anew. As such, moves to save the euro will probably shape the direction—or even future—of the entire EU as it seek a collective horizon to look toward.

News reports Nov. 10 stated France and Germany were consulting partners on potentially radical harmonization measures between euro zone members—or at least those capable of and willing to accept far stricter budgetary and fiscal rules that greater convergence would involve. If true, it suggests the euro zone’s two biggest economies are contemplating tossing unsustainably indebted currency partners out of what would become a smaller, tighter euro ship. German Chancellor Angela Merkel denied those reports, insisting scission of the euro 17 wasn’t an option. Yet her comments elsewhere indicated the status quo could not endure, either. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sarkozy And Merkel Call For A ‘True European Economic Government’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 17, 2011


What does that “True” mean?
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

BIG PHOTOS: Berlin Marks 50 Years Since Construction Of Wall That Divided East From West

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 13, 2011


Historic wall.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in International | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Quality Of Life Index 2010: Which Country Has It Best? (PHOTOS)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 25, 2011

The Hffington Post

In order according to this post 

1. France

2. Australia

3.  Switzerland

4. Germany

5. New Zealand

6. Luxemburg

7. United States

8. Belgium

9. Canada

10. Italy

 

 

 

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Palestine: the world’s next nation

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 22, 2011

In four days the UN Security Council will meet, and the world has an opportunity to embrace a new proposal that could turn the tide on decades of failed Israeli-Palestinian peace talks: UN recognition of the state of Palestine.

Over 120 nations from the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America have already endorsed this initiative, but Israel’s right-wing government and the US vehemently oppose it. The UK and other key European countries are still undecided, but a massive public push now could tip them to vote for this momentous opportunity to end 40 years of military occupation.

US-led peace initiatives have failed for decades, while Israel has confined the Palestinians to small areas, confiscated their lands and blocked their independence. This bold new initiative could be the best opportunity to jump start a resolution of the conflict, but Europe and the UK must take the lead. Let’s build a massive global call for the UK and other European leaders to endorse this statehood bid now, and make clear that citizens across the world support this legitimate, non-violent, diplomatic proposal. Sign the petition and send this to everyone:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/independence_for_palestine_uk/?vl

While the roots of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are complex, most people on all sides agree that the best path to peace now is the creation of two states. But repeated peace processes have been undermined by violence on both sides, extensive Israeli settlement-building in the West Bank, and the humanitarian blockade on Gaza. The Israeli occupation has shrunk and fragmented the territory for a Palestinian state and made daily life a crippling ordeal for the Palestinian people. The UN, World Bank and IMF have all recently announced that Palestinians are ready to run an independent state, but say the main constraint to success is the Israeli occupation. Even the US President has called for an end to settlement expansion and a return to the 1967 borders with mutually agreed land-swaps, but Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu has furiously refused to cooperate. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global, Middle East | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Obama to Merkel: Europe Needs a Leader — and You’re It

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 10, 2011

By WILLIAM BOSTON / BERLIN

Beyond the broad smiles, the jokes about Hillary Clinton’s wardrobe, and the ceremonial reassurances that accompanied

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks to President Barack Obama during a private dinner at the 1789 restaurant in Washington June 6, 2011. Jesco Dezel / Reuters

German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s three-day visit to Washington this week, there was a clear message that President Barack Obama expects Germany to demonstrate leadership with NATO and in Europe. Considering the context — Tuesday’s love fest on the White House lawn — Obama was outspoken in urging his guest to take more responsibility in Libya, saying that he expected full and robust German support for the ongoing airstrikes.(Obama’s Illegal War in Libya)

And so it is hardly surprising that Merkel’s defense minister, Thomas de Maiziere, speaking to reporters on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Brussels on Thursday, suggested that Germany could consider sending peace-keeping troops to Libya once Colonel Muammar Gaddafi is out of the way.

Berlin’s new posture on Libya is an about-face for Merkel, after Germany alienated its allies when it abstained from the crucial U.N. Security Council vote authorizing military action against Gaddafi’s troops. Which is why Obama’s decision to award Merkel the Presidential Medal of Freedom and host her at an official state dinner at the White House raised more than a few eyebrows in Washington. And clearly Obama’s gesture, even if the decision was made before the Libya vote, had to come at a price.

“Merkel has learned that there is no such thing as a free dinner in Washington,” says Josef Braml, an expert on U.S. foreign policy and transatlantic relations at the German Council on Foreign Relations in Berlin. “Not siding with our allies [on Libya] was a major foreign-policy mistake.”

German Defense Minister De Maiziere said on Thursday that even though Germany is not engaged militarily in Libya today, Berlin still supports the NATO mission. He said Germany was ready to take responsibility in the post-conflict phase: “We hope there will be a solution which does not require a military presence there, but instead involves economic or infrastructure assistance, perhaps with the formation of security forces.”(Faith in the Arab Spring) Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The 2% Economy

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 5, 2011

By RANA FOROOHAR

John Kenneth Galbraith, one of the most famous practitioners of the high-minded guessing game known as economics,

Illustration by Harry Campbell for TIME

once noted that in the dismal science, “the majority is always wrong.” How else to explain the fact that so many economists upgraded their growth forecasts for the American economy at the end of last year, often to well above 3%, when the numbers so far this year have come in below 2%? The plunge is due to many things, from higher food and oil prices to supply-chain disruptions in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster to a terrible housing market. (The latest Case-Shiller data show that home prices have fallen further than they did during the Great Depression.)

But the bottom line is that the 2% economy is reshuffling the deck on everything from the debt debate to job growth to the likely outcome of the 2012 elections. Here in the U.S., there won’t be many winners.(See if Wall Street is aiding the recovery or strangling it.)

To understand why, a little math is in order. When the economy grows faster, tax receipts go up too. That can make a big difference in the debt picture. For example, if the economy grew steadily at, say, 3.9% — which the Fed, in its own moment of irrational exuberance back in February, predicted it might for the year — our national debt (including Social Security and other entitlements) would decline over the next decade from roughly 100% of GDP to a relatively svelte 83%. No more excruciating conversations about cutting Grandma’s health benefits or squeezing another five kids into already overcrowded classrooms. If, on the other hand, we grow at 1.8% over the next 10 years, debt rises to 144% of GDP. That makes us Greece. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

10 Countries With The Worst Income Inequality: OECD

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 24, 2011


No idea how to trust this.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

‘World’s Most Premature Baby’ Leaves German Hospital After Spending Easter At Home

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 26, 2011


Is that possible? My daughter was born at 28 weeks and it was very difficult for us and she was in incubator for 2 weeks. She was about 2.5 kg in the beginning.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

India raises UTL unpaid Royalty issue, meets Nepal Army Chief, but why?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 25, 2011

Indian Military personnel be allowed to guard Nepal’s northern frontier with China, Nepal should be under India’s Security Umbrella, stationing of Indian Air Marshals at Tribhuwan International Airport, presence of Indian military officials at each and every districts of Nepal in the name Ex-Gurkha pension Camps and now a strange Indian proposal has come which is to permit India deploying its security machinery to guard embassy premises and their officials.

India- the self declared honest friend is apparently hell bent on destroying whatever image of Nepal remains in the comity of nations as a nation-state.

At a time when third country nationals feel more and more unsafe in the streets of Kathmandu due to frequently happening broad day light firing incidents with fatal casualties carried out by Indian state nurtured criminals who enter Nepal through the open border, Indian foreign minister S.M. Krishna claimed at the bilateral meeting held in Hotel Yak and Yeti upon his arrival that Nepal should allow his country to take care of its citizens in Nepal because they feel unsafe in Nepal.

Arm twisting of the highest order.

Krishna was right in what he said, “Either we need to be assured that we are safe, if not we should be allowed to take care of our officials.”

If Nepal allowed this facility to India then the next moment countries like China, Pakistan, France, Germany, United States of America and Israel and many others will follow suit and demand the same from Nepal. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Asia | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: