Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘GPS For The Soul’

Good News: You Are Not Your Brain

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 8, 2012

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., FACP, and Dr. Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy, Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School Director, Genetics and Aging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

Like a personal computer, science needs a recycle bin for ideas that didn’t work out as planned. In this bin would go commuter trains riding on frictionless rails using superconductivity, along with interferon, the last AIDS vaccine, and most genetic therapies. These failed promises have two things in common: They looked like the wave of the future but then reality proved too complex to fit the simple model that was being offered.

The next thing to go into the recycle bin might be the brain. We are living in a golden age of brain research, thanks largely to vast improvements in brain scans. Now that functional MRIs can give snapshots of the brain in real time, researchers can see specific areas of the brain light up, indicating increased activity. On the other hand, dark spots in the brain indicate minimal activity or none at all. Thus, we arrive at those familiar maps that compare a normal brain with one that has deviated from the norm. This is obviously a great boon where disease is concerned. Doctors can see precisely where epilepsy or Parkinsonism or a brain tumor has created damage, and with this knowledge new drugs and more precise surgery can target the problem.

But then overreach crept in. We are shown brain scans of repeat felons with pointers to the defective areas of their brains. The same holds for Buddhist monks, only in their case, brain activity is heightened and improved, especially in the prefrontal lobes associated with compassion. By now there is no condition, good or bad, that hasn’t been linked to a brain pattern that either “proves” that there is a link between the brain and a certain behavior or exhibits the “cause” of a certain trait. The whole assumption, shared by 99 percent of neuroscientists, is that we are our brains.

In this scheme, the brain is in charge, having evolved to control certain fixed behaviors. Why do men see other men as rivals for a desirable woman? Why do people seek God? Why does snacking in front of the TV become a habit? We are flooded with articles and books reinforcing the same assumption: The brain is using you, not the other way around. Yet it’s clear that a faulty premise is leading to gross overreach. Read the rest of this entry »

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Soul-Talk: Are You Self-Actualizing or Just Self-Conceptualizing?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 12, 2012

By Russel Bishop, Author, Consultant and Executive Coach

Do you find yourself struggling from time to time, trying to reconcile your self-image with the reactions and opinions of others? Do you let the approval of others interfere with you becoming more of who you truly are? Do you struggle with trying to defend, explain or justify your choices when others disapprove? I know I have bumped up against these challenges throughout my life. As much as I have grown over the years, this struggle continues to plague me even today. I guess the old adage from Richard Bach is completely true in my case: “We most teach what we need to learn.”

For many, myself included, the challenge lies in the difference between self-actualizing and self-conceptualizing. Your self-concepts may be perfectly aligned with who you truly are, or they may be nothing more than, well, concepts.

The Approval Trap

Do you ever pretend to be independent of the opinions others hold of you? I know that I often find myself in that trap these days. Some part of me still desires to please other people beyond reason, while a deeper part of me, my Soul-Talk, encourages me to stand in the integrity of who I am, of what I perceive, and of what I know.

That can be difficult when being, perception and knowledge run afoul of those to whom I am given approval authority over my own experience. When I am in deeper levels of alignment with my own soul, I can recognize the contradictory, even conflicting opinions others may hold about or toward me and remain loving, caring and in a state of acceptance. In one way of looking at this, when I am centered in my soul, it’s easy to allow others to disagree without needing to become defensive or critical. Read the rest of this entry »

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Who or What Is God?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 26, 2012

By Peter Baksa, Investigative Journalist/Entreprenuer/Author of ‘The Point of Power’

“The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion, as well as, all serious endeavour. He who never had this experience, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced, there is a something that the mind cannot grasp; whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly; this is religiousness. In this sense I am religious.” — Albert Einstein

The laws of physics have conspired to make collisions of atoms produce plants, trees, animals and humans. In fact, these laws produced collections of atoms that don’t just obey Newton’s laws in a passive way. Some jump, mate, run and think. The laws of physics, working through Darwin’s natural selection, have produced these gigantic collections of apparently purposeful beings who look as though they have been designed. Once Darwin determined how to get complicated, designed beings from the simplest of forms, he gave us an intellectual foothold to begin to see a process that we refer to as evolution. We know since 1859 how this all happens.

Math and science use principle-centered, complex frameworks to describe and understand phenomena on all scales of time and space. Reality, on the other hand, operates at all intervals simultaneously. Our existence, as we see it, is an illusion.

“We are spirit having human experiences not the other way around.”

A starving child, longing for food, has no clock to measure the movement of the sun and the earth around their shared center of mass. Looking down from my high-rise in Chicago I often look over the hundreds of people mulling about on the beach, each existing from a particular point, their own universe if you will. A fly’s eyes have hundreds of different facets. It is able to detect the briefest flickers of movement, perceiving reality under a completely different guise than we humans.The mind of an Alzheimer’s patient cannot use the human construct of time. For such a person, the chronology of existence is broken, living without the element of time or memory to assist in formulating their reality. Time is an illusion, as is space. Read the rest of this entry »

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A Personal Mission: Define Your Wellness (Part 2)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 31, 2012

   

By Deepak Chopra, Author, ‘War of the Worldviews’; Founder, The Chopra Foundation

 Step 6: Realistically Plan for Setbacks

No one walks a straight line on the journey to wellness. Most studies of lapses in fitness, nutrition and recovery programs show that you can get back on track more easily if you have scripted the way you will recover. It’s also known that those who are successful in breaking highly addictive habits, such as chain smoking, tried and failed any number of times before finally succeeding. So persistence counts, and so does avoiding the familiar excuse of “I’ve tried everything.” The answer is to go back and try everything again.

In planning for setbacks in a realistic frame of mind, the Mayo Clinic recommends taking these steps:

  • Take charge. Accept responsibility for your own behavior.
  • Buy time. If you’re tempted to keep indulging, wait a few minutes and see if the desire passes. Try distracting yourself — call a friend or take the dog for a walk.
  • Be gentle with yourself. Practice self-forgiveness. Try not to think of your slip-up as a catastrophe.
  • Ask for and accept help. Asking for help is a sign of good judgment, not weakness.
  • Work out your guilt and frustration with exercise. Use it to elevate your mood and recommit to your goals — never use it as punishment for a lapse.
  • Problem-solve as you go. Identify the problem and create a list of possible solutions. If you try one that doesn’t work, try the next solution.
  • Recommit to your goals — review your goals and make certain that they are still realistic.

Step 7: Reaching Your Goal

Reaching a wellness goal, once it has happened, is a big deal. Make sure you mark it accordingly. If you have given up smoking for a long period of time, treat yourself to new shoes or a great book. If you’ve lost weight, buy yourself a new outfit. You deserve to be rewarded, while making sure that you don’t rationalize going on a credit card binge or eating a huge meal as some kind of false reward. Read the rest of this entry »

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