Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Happiness’

Matthieu Ricard: The habits of happiness

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 6, 2014

What is happiness, and how can we all get some? Biochemist turned Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard says we can train our minds in habits of well-being, to generate a true sense of serenity and fulfillment.

After training in biochemistry at the Institute Pasteur, Matthieu Ricard left science behind to move to the Himalayas and become a Buddhist monk — and to pursue happiness, both at a basic human level and as a subject of inquiry. Achieving happiness, he has come to believe, requires the same kind of effort and mind training that any other serious pursuit involves.

His deep and scientifically tinged reflections on happiness and Buddhism have turned into several books, including The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet. At the same time, he also makes sensitive and jaw-droppingly gorgeous photographs of his beloved Tibet and the spiritual hermitage where he lives and works on humanitarian projects.

His latest book on happiness is Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life’s Most Important Skill; his latest book of photographs is Tibet: An Inner Journey.

“Matthieu Ricard, French translator and right-hand man for the Dalai Lama, has been the subject of intensive clinical tests at the University of Wisconsin, as a result of which he is frequently described as the happiest man in the world.”

Robert Chalmers, The Independent 

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A Secret to Happiness: Clean Off My Desk

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 27, 2013

Gretchen Rubin, Bestselling author; blogger http://www.happiness-project.com

Gretchen Rubin2370299One of the big insights I’ve gained from my happiness project is that for me (as for many people),outer order contributes to inner calm. I feel more serene and cheerful if my apartment and office aren’t too messy.

Something else I’ve learned from my happiness project is to be wary whenever I have the urge to “treat” myself, because often my treats don’t make me happy in the long run. One of my “treats” is to let piles of papers, clothes, books, and dishes pile up – which does indeed end up making me feel less happy.

When I need to to calm myself, I take an hour and clean my office. I did this a few days ago. I’d been under some pressure, and I’d let it become a wreck, because I wasn’t taking the time to put anything away. I kept putting off little tasks, thinking, “It’s more important to answer my emails,” “I need to get this little piece written first,” “I need a break, I don’t want to deal with this now,” but finally, I got down to it.

I set aside an hour and tackled the mess. Methodically I entered reading notes, copied information, filed, wrote emails, tossed papers, took coffee cups to the kitchen, etc. One of my daily habits is to take notes on a scratch pad – mostly to-do reminders – and these pile up quickly. I worked my way through the items on those sheets so I could toss them out. Read the rest of this entry »

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Happy Happiness Day!

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 21, 2013

By Jeffrey Sachs, Director, Earth Institute at Columbia University; Author, ‘The Price of Civilization’

international-happiness-dayLet me be the first to wish you a very Happy Happiness Day! In case you didn’t know it, today is the first International Day of Happiness, launched by all 193 UN member states. Happiness Day doesn’t mean we’ve arrived at happiness, but it does mean that we’ve recognized that happiness is our goal — and that our societies need to work harder to promote the things that really matter in the 21st century.

The fourth king of the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan led the way 40 years ago, drawing on ancient Buddhist wisdom. Bhutan should pursue Gross National Happiness (GNH) rather than Gross National Product (GNP) like the rest of the world. Since then, Bhutan has been experimenting with a new holistic approach to development that emphasizes not just economic growth but also culture, mental health, compassion, and community. Bhutan is searching for a balanced society.

It’s a worthy search. Bhutan aims to avoid the Easterlin Paradox that grips the US. Professor Richard Easterlin discovered many years ago that America was becoming much richer per person but not happier, at least not according to the direct reports of wellbeing by Americans responding to surveys. This is sobering, indeed. We are threatening the planet with pollution, climate change, and other environmental degradation to chase more and more goods that don’t seem to do so much to really make us any happier.

My colleagues Richard Layard, John Helliwell and I reported on the evidence on happiness in last year’s first World Happiness Report, prepared for a UN meeting on happiness promoted by Bhutan. (We’ll have the Second World Happiness Report out this fall.) We used worldwide survey data to look at the factors that truly make people happy. Income of course matters, but mainly to the poor. When people are hungry, deprived of basic needs such as clean water, health care, and education, and without meaningful employment, they indeed suffer. Economic development that alleviates poverty is a vital step in boosting happiness. Read the rest of this entry »

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Global Voice on Peace

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 5, 2012

On the auspicious occasion of 4th Lumbini-Kapilvastu Day, the Movement created this clip to spread Buddha’s peace message all over the world.   Participants:

Agni Frank Eickermann -Spiritual leader, USA
Venerable Samahita Thero, Sri Lanka
Miss Nepal Australia 2011 – Reecha Dhital
Miss Nepal Australia 2012 – Deepashree Shah
Mister Nepal Australia 2012 – Niraj Sharma
Ram Kumar Shrestha – Lumbini-Kapilvastu Day Movement Global Coordinator
Indu Nishani Nanayakkara, Sri Lanka

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Why Tall People Are Happier Than Short People

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 30, 2012

By SEAN GREGORY

Shaquille O'Neal enters the court through a path of young fans as he's introduced as a new Cleveland Cavalier at the Cleveland Clinic on July 2 in Independence, Ohio David Liam Kyle / NBAE / Getty

Shaquille O’Neal enters the court through a path of young fans as he’s introduced as a new Cleveland Cavalier at the Cleveland Clinic on July 2 in Independence, Ohio David Liam Kyle / NBAE / Getty

Damn you, tall people. They block your view at the movie theater. They’re a pain to shop for: Who really wants to drag themselves to the Big & Tall to buy Uncle Lurch a pair of extra-long pants? They’re the ones with better chances of becoming pro basketball players, or supermodels.

Squirts probably don’t need any more reasons to envy their longer-limbed neighbors. Unfortunately, a new study just added to the indignity of short people. According to a paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research, both men and women who are above average height — 5 ft. 10 in. for males, 5 ft. 4 in. for females — report higher levels of happiness than smaller people.(See 10 perfect jobs for the recession — and after.) Read the rest of this entry »

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Deepak Chopra- Learn How to Meditate (Nauči meditirati)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 9, 2012

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5 Things to Give Up to Be Happy

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 18, 2012

By Amy Chan, Relationship & lifestyle columnist, Writer for amyfabulous.com

When we think about how to create more happiness, we typically look for things to achieve and add to our lives. However, sometimes the key to happiness is actually giving up certain perspectives and behaviors. Here are a few things to give up in order to become happier individuals.

Give up the habit of blaming. Blame is a scapegoat for taking responsibility of your own outcome. It is a lot easier to point the finger at someone or something else instead of looking within. Blame is not constructive. It does not help you or the other person — nobody wins in the blame game. The amount of energy and stress it takes to blame just takes away from you moving forward and finding a solution.

Give up your need to impress. When you accept who you are, and you embrace your quirks, flaws, strengths and vulnerability, you get a lot more comfortable in your own skin. And when you’re confident, you stop caring so much about what everyone thinks of you. You stop worrying if someone will like you or not, because deep down you know that the people who falsely judge you don’t matter in your life.

Give up being a victim. The perspective that you are just the result of all external variables deflects responsibility for taking control over your own life. It is unfortunate that sometimes bad things happen to the best of people. Life can be unfair, unkind and unjust. However, being stuck in a victim mentality does not nurture your ability to move forward and onward. Read the rest of this entry »

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For China, Economic Growth Doesn’t Always Equal Happiness

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 16, 2012

CHINA PHOTOS / GETTY IMAGES
A woman washes clothes next to a railway near a shanty town in Shenyang, China

When Bo Xilai, the rising Chinese Communist Party official who was purged in March, gave his last public comments before disappearing into detention, he was wrong about a lot of things. That bit about not being under investigation, for instance. But one line he uttered has the clear ring of truth, and it poses a serious issue for China’s leadership as it attempts to navigate this year’s political transition, the economic slowdown and the ripples loosed by Bo’s removal. Bo revealed that China’s Gini coefficient — a statistic that measures the gap between rich and poor — had entered into worrying territory. He described the number, which hasn’t been made public in over a decade, as over 0.46. Anything higher than 0.4 is considered dangerously high and capable of fueling unrest.

In Chongqing, where Bo was Communist Party secretary for 4½ years, he made building economic protections like subsidized housing for the megacity’s poorest residents one of the tenets of his “Chongqing model.” The wholesale corruption he and his family have been accused of may have steered the wealth gap in the wrong direction, but Bo understood the political importance of appearing to care about the problem, just as he knew the appeal of cracking down on crime and reviving Mao-era culture.

It’s a point that many other officials seem to have missed, mindful perhaps of Deng Xiaoping’s declaration that “some will get rich first,” but forgetting the coda that their prosperity would then spread to all. China’s growth in recent decades has been astonishing and surveys like the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project have found high levels of satisfaction and optimism in China. But there is more to those numbers. A deeper examination of Chinese citizens’ levels of satisfaction indicates that while the country’s richest are increasingly content, the poor are growing more and more unhappy. Read the rest of this entry »

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Happiness Means Getting to Know Disappointment? (Pema Chödron)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 25, 2012

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Why $50,000 May Be the (New) Happiness Tipping Point

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 22, 2012

By JOSH SANBURN

Illustration by Alexander Ho for TIME

ILLUSTRATION BY ALEXANDER HO FOR TIME

A landmark 2010 Princeton University study showed that money really can buy happiness — up to a very specific point. The researchers (including Nobelist Daniel Kahneman) found that up to about $75,000, annual income closely correlates with emotional well-being. Beyond that threshold, however, more income doesn’t translate into more happiness. On average, an American earning $575,000 isn’t likely to be any happier than one making $75,000.

Well, forget $75,000. A new poll by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion suggests that as little as $50,000 brings genuine happiness. According to the survey, those below $50K weren’t as personally satisfied with their lives as those above that mark in areas such as one’s housing situation, personal relationships and overall direction in life.

(MORE: Is a Busy Retiree a Happy Retiree?) Read the rest of this entry »

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The Greatest Speech Ever Made – Charlie Chaplin

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 6, 2012

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The U.N. Happiness Summit

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 2, 2012

By Stewart PatrickCFR.org*

At first glance, this Monday’s high-level event in the U.N. General Assembly would appear to confirm the worst suspicions of U.N. skeptics. Given all the crises engulfing the globe, what geniuses in New York decided to have the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan host a daylong special session on “Happiness.”What the heck is going on in Turtle Bay? More than meets the eye, in fact. One of the hottest fields in development economics has been, believe it or not, happiness research. And it turns out that the government in Thimpu may have something wise to say on the subject.

In recent years, a small but influential group of economists has concluded that traditional measurements of national progress, typically couched in terms of per capita Gross National Product (GNP), don’t actually tell us much about the wellbeing of citizens. This is partly a critique of modernization theory, which suggests that human welfare advances in lockstep with material enrichment.

In fact, as pioneering researchers like Carol Graham of the Brookings Institution and the University of Maryland have shown, there’s little correlation between national income and contentment. Some of the highest levels of happiness have been recorded in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa, for example. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Happiest Countries Are in Northern Europe

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 31, 2012

By John Halliwell, Richard Layard and Jefferey Sachs

Is it possible to measure the happiness of the world’s population? Remarkably it is, and the first World Happiness Report published today does just that.

Even more remarkable is next Monday’s United Nations conference on happiness, for which the report was prepared. Last July the UN General Assembly invited all member governments to give more importance to happiness as a goal of public policy and mandated this conference as part of the process.

This means that there is now high world-level support for the demand that governments pay more attention to the happiness of their peoples when they form their policies. This is not, we emphasize, a matter of following the whims, fads, and consumer urges of the population. These do not, according to the evidence, lead to happiness. It is, rather, a matter of helping societies to find a path to what really matters more deeply and lastingly for well-being.

So what does matter in determining the happiness or life satisfaction in a nation? Income of course matters to everyone, especially the poorest. As the report shows, the richest countries are a lot happier than the poorest. The four happiest are all in Northern Europe (Denmark, Norway, Finland and the Netherlands) and the four least happy are in Sub-Saharan Africa. On a 0-10 scale, the average life evaluation score is 7.6 in the first four countries and only 3.4 in the last four. Read the rest of this entry »

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Laughing Buddha 3

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 17, 2012

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How the Buddha Would Interpret the Law of Attraction

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 18, 2011


Specially people from developed countries are using scientific achievemen­ts abundantly and seem to be spending happy life that could be the dream for most of the people from underdevel­oped countries. Neverthele­ss, on the contrary, evidences suggest that most of the fractions of the population in developed countries are lacking the natural sleep in their early age; facing problemati­c family life in the name of individual freedom due to frequent divorce; suffering comparativ­ely much more dementia problem in old age. Sound sleep like of every baby is vital for normal life. People start to loss sound sleep owing to their stressed life. These aberration­s in the life, undoubtedl­y, could not be corroborat­ive evidences for happy life.

Then what is happy life? Happy life could not be defined merely with the moment of marriage or good new job opportunit­y or enjoying with holidays in the most desired place or procuring a latest model new car or buying most dreamed houses or holding big Internatio­nal business companies etc. etc. Happy life should be defined on the basis of the overall life and more importantl­y present situation and interestin­gly that depends on every day’s real observant mentality.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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