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Posts Tagged ‘Health care’

Supreme Court Health Care Decision: Individual Mandate Survives

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 29, 2012

 News with more than 68,000 comments and more than 13,000 shares
Obamacare

WASHINGTON — The individual health insurance mandate is constitutional, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday, upholding the central provision of President Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act.

The controlling opinion, written by Chief Justice John Roberts, upheld the mandate as a tax, although concluded it was not valid as an exercise of Congress’ commerce clause power. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan joined in the outcome.

The decision in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius comes as something of a surprise after the generally hostile reception the law received during the six hours of oral arguments held over three days in March. But by siding with the court’s four Democratic appointees, Chief Justice Roberts avoided the delegitimizing taint of politics that surrounds a party-line vote while passing Obamacare’s fate back to the elected branches. GOP candidates and incumbents will surely spend the rest of the 2012 campaign season running against the Supreme Court and for repeal of the law.

Five justices concluded that the mandate, which requires virtually all Americans to obtain minimum health insurance coverage or pay a penalty, falls within Congress’ power under the Constitution to “lay and collect taxes.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Why India Is Still One of the Most Dangerous Places to Give Birth

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 10, 2012

India’s economy may be booming, but when it comes to providing adequate health care to pregnant women, the country is falling behind even its poorer neighbors.
ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP / Getty Images

ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A new born baby sleeps in the arms of her mother at a Community Health Center in Mall, near the central east Indian city of Lucknow on October 31, 2011.

In March, Preeti Singh almost died giving birth. The 22-year-old resident of a village about a half hour’s drive from New Delhi was pregnant with twins and planned to give birth with the help of an untrained midwife. When things went wrong during the delivery, she rushed to three government hospitals in search of help before her family decided to take out a loan for $1,000 to send her to a private hospital. Preeti and one of the twins survived. “Giving birth is not easy,” she said. “But maybe if I was taken to a hospital to give birth or a competent dai (midwife) was there, it would not have been so traumatic and my other child would have been saved.”

Indeed, with basic maternity care, many lives in India would be saved. According to a 2010 study by the Harvard School of Public Health, 150,000 deaths could be prevented by 2015 if Indian women had access to better family planning and health care during their pregnancies and deliveries. But that medical help has yet to arrive. A new report by Save the Children suggests that, despite India’s booming economy, the country is still one of the most high-risk places in the world to give birth. It ranked India as the fourth-worst country among 80 less-developed nations in its survey, with nearly half of all births taking place without a trained health professional. “Even though India has made efforts to improve maternal health by encouraging institutional deliveries and taking other measures,” says Thomas Chandy, the head of Save the Children India, “the benefits have not yet appeared to bring about a shift.”  Read the rest of this entry »

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Six-Legged Baby Has Four Limbs Amputated After Successful Surgery In Karachi, Pakistan (PICTURES)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 21, 2012

By Sara C Nelson

A baby has had four of the six legs he was born with successfully removed, surgeons have announced.

The little boy, born in Sukkur, a city in Sindh Province earlier this month, underwent eight hours of surgery at Pakistan’s National Institute of Child Health (NICH), in Karachi.

On Thursday Dr Jamal Raza announced the operation had been a success. He told a press conference the extra limbs had been the result of a genetic disease which affects just one in a million babies.

There had been speculation the child’s condition was due to the presence of a conjoined twin.

Six-Legged Baby Born In Pakistan, ‘Could Be Conjoined Twins’ (PICTURES) Read the rest of this entry »

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White House Burning: Putting Out the Wrong Fire

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 28, 2012

By Dean Baker, Co-Director of CEPR; Author, ‘The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive’

I have enormous respect for Simon Johnson. I first recall seeing him one late evening on a Bill Moyers segment in the middle of the financial crisis. I couldn’t quite believe that the former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund was complaining about the oligarchs in the financial industry using their control of the U.S. government to bail out their bankrupt banks. This was more likely attributable to too much alcohol or too little sleep than anything that could really be happening in this world.

Remarkably, it turned out to be true. Ever since the beginning of the financial crisis, Johnson, along with his co-author James Kwak, has been a tireless proponent of financial reform. Their blog, Baseline Scenario is an essential source for those following the debate over financial reform, as well as other issues. Their last book, 13 Bankers, is a great account of the growing concentration in the financial industry that left us with too big to fail banks.

Given their heroic role in the financial reform debate, I am not anxious to criticize Johnson and Kwak’s new book, White House Burning. But there are some important areas of difference that deserve attention.

The basic thesis of White House Burning is that the country is on an unsustainable fiscal path. Unlike some of the Chicken Littles leading the budget debate, Johnson and Kwak are responsible in how they lay out the case. There is no nonsense about runaway government spending. They explicitly refute this story. Most categories of government spending, except defense, have remained constant or fallen as a share of GDP since the budget surplus days of the late 90s. Read the rest of this entry »

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Dean Ornish and Deepak Chopra at TEDMED 2009

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 1, 2010

World renown persons’ view points on ways that everyone can heal and be healthier.

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