Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Higgs Boson’

What Would God Think of the God Particle? (Part 2)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 29, 2013

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., FACP and Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Chapman University

Deepak ChopraThe “God particle” seems to be well and truly with us. The award on October 3 of the Nobel Prize in physics that focused on the Higgs boson – the technical term for the God particle – capped a decades-long search that has cost billions of dollars. In the first post we discussed why the discovery of the elusive, fleeting Higgs boson is two-edged. It represents a triumph in human curiosity and our drive to understand the universe. At the same time, however, a huge stumbling block hasn’t been overcome. In fact, the Higgs boson may indicate that creation (whether God exists or not) is becoming ever more mysterious.

The mammoth collider at CERN Switzerland blasted the Higgs boson out of the invisible quantum field so that it could be observed, at the faintest level of measurement and then only for precious milliseconds. But this was enough to disclose the finest level of the subatomic realm so far known to be real. The problem with getting this close to the source of creation is that space, time, gravity, matter, and energy have become more and more ambiguous, as if the quantum revolution hadn’t already done enough in that department. With the probability that so-called “dark” matter and energy may account for 96 percent of the universe – along with another probability, that “dark” stuff doesn’t obey the same laws as visible mater and energy – the picture of creation is undergoing radical revision.

Stephen Hawking added to the ambiguity in his last book, The Grand Design, by siding with those who have basically given up on a Theory of Everything and are settling for a piecemeal patchwork or mosaic of theories, each pertaining to distinct regions of creation while never being synthesized into one grand design. If God exists, the deity must be smiling. For behind the high fives and hoopla over the Higgs boson, there’s a growing doubt that we are anywhere near to understanding the nature of reality. These doubts arise from two major sources.

First, there’s broad agreement that science doesn’t comprehensively describe reality to begin with. Over a century ago the pioneers of quantum theory dismantled the common-sense notion that the world “out there” consists of hard, solid, tangible things. As one of the greatest of these pioneers, Werner Heisenberg, noted, “The atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts.” No one has ever refuted this claim, and when you add into the mixture the Uncertainty Principle, which says that quantum objects can be located only by the probability that they will appear at a certain place (only after it is observed does a particle actually settle into a measurable position), the solid, tangible world is radically undermined. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

What Would God Think of the God Particle? Part 1

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 10, 2013

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., FACP and Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Chapman University

Deepak-chopraThe award of the Nobel Prize in physics generally creates a mental blur for most people, since no one can comprehend the current state of physics without training in advanced mathematics. This year was somewhat different, thanks to a nickname.

As the world learned on October 3, the British physicist Peter Higgs and the Belgian physicist Francois Englert shared the Nobel, as was widely expected in the profession. The award was given for a theory involving a missing particle in the so-called Standard Model of particle physics. The particle had come to be known as the Higgs boson when it was postulated or more popularly as “the God particle” from a 1993 book by Leon Lederman, another Nobel laureate who also served as the director of the prestigious Fermilab.

The discovery last year at CERN in Switzerland of the Higgs boson was a triumph for the Standard Model theory. Higgs and Englert, along with Robert Brout, Gerald Guralnik, C. R. Hagen, and Tom Kibble, had hypothesized the existence of a field filling the entire vacuum of space. If it hadn’t been dubbed the God particle, physicists wouldn’t be saddled with an embarrassing, catchy name. Meant initially as a joke, the enduring moniker suggests that in some way science has reached an ultimate destination. Creation has surrendered its final secret, even if there is no God. But in reality particle physics keeps moving forward, and after the celebration at finding a Higgs boson dies down, new frontiers will open up. Meanwhile, every physicist who is asked about the God particle takes pains to distance himself from the label, including Higgs himself.

Now that God has been invoked in the discussion, however, it’s worth asking if we are getting closer to understanding Him/Her/It in a way that matters beyond the arcane of quantum physics. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2012

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 17, 2013

Robert T. Gonzalez and Annalee Newitz

This was an incredible year for science and engineering. We sent a powerful robot scientist to Mars, and we discovered the elusive Higgs Boson particle, plus there were world-changing innovations in medicine and materials science. We sequenced the genome of a human ancestor, and looked into the mind of an artificial intelligence that recognized the content of images on the web for the first time (of course it included cat faces). Here are the seventeen biggest scientific breakthroughs of 2012.

 The Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2012

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Lands on Mars

NASA’s one-ton, six-wheel-drive, nuclear-powered science laboratory — aka Curiosity —touched down on the surface of Mars in early August, following an eight-month voyage across millions of miles of space. It is far and away the biggest and most scientifically capable rover ever sent to another planet. The landing sequence, alone, which required lowering the rover to the surface of the planet from a hovering, rocket-powered sky crane, was the most technically impressive ever attempted, and played out beautifully.

Today, just five months into Curiosity‘s two-year primary mission, the rover is still just stretching its legs, but has already made several intriguing discoveries. In the months to come, the rover will begin poring over the pages of Mars’ history, as it scans the layers of sedimentary rock comprising Mount Sharp in search of signs of whether the planet can, or ever could, support life.

 The Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2012

Artificial DNA Brings Us Closer Than Ever to Synthesizing Entirely New Forms of Life

Synthetic biologists demonstrated that artificial nucleic acids known as “XNAs” can replicate and evolve just like DNA and RNA, and are even more resistant to degradation than the real thing. The implications of evolvable, artificial genetic information are vast, to put it lightly, and stand to affect everything from genetic research to the search for alien life, to the creation of an entirely synthetic, alternative life form. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article, Science &Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Will the “God Particle” Replace God?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

By Deepak Chopra

If you went to church in the 18th century, you would have heard God described as a celestial clockmaker who had wound up the universe and left it to run itself. Today, the wind-up is the Big Bang and the clock’s parts are subatomic particles. But the problem of creating matter out of emptiness remains the same.

How does matter form from the immaterial? What gives particles their mass, and how do they stick together? The physicists at the CERN facility in Europe are busy using the massive multibillion-dollar Large Hadron Collider to try to answer those questions by hunting for the elusive Higgs boson, the so-called “God particle.”

The search takes place between the visible and the invisible. The hypothetical Higgs boson is a virtual particle, which means it can be coaxed to enter spacetime for the tiniest flash of a millisecond. It operates at the Planck scale, which is millions of times smaller than the nucleus of an atom. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Did God Discover the God Particle?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., FACP, Rudolph Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Chapman University

The possible discovery of the Higgs boson would not have been splashed across every major media if the tag “God particle” weren’t attached to it. Physicists hate the term, but they love the publicity. There are huge government grants at stake as well as the prestige of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland. After you read the headline, however, there’s little doubt that a general reader cannot actually grasp what a Higgs boson is (or a large hadron accelerator, either).

If you watch enough PBS programs and listen to a few physicists, some clarity emerges that a non-physicist can understand. The Higgs boson discovery adds validation to a mathematical model of force fields in the universe. It attaches a real particle to an expectation, the expectation that buried inside force fields was the key to why subatomic particles have mass. Mass would be acquired as a particle meets with resistance when it moves through the vacuum of space, a kind of “molasses” that slows it down.

This molasses is very elusive. It took many billions of colliding protons in the huge CERN accelerator, backed up by 100,000 computers around the world, to analyze the data before the discovery seemed real. Even then, most physicists are guarded about whether this new particle actually is a Higgs boson. They are equally guarded about whether its properties will uphold the Standard Model of force fields or in fact create more problems. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Interactive Panorama: Step Inside the Large Hadron Collider

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 16, 2012

 

A note to viewers: LightBox suggests viewing the panorama in full-screen mode. For visitors on a mobile device or tablet, we recommend utilizing our versions optimized for a fully immersive experience: 

iPAD version iPHONE version

Above: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two main detectors at the LHC. It weighs 12,500 tons, measures 69 ft. (21 m) in length and is a key research tool for 2,000 scientists hailing from 37 countries. It was built above ground and lowered into place—a sensible strategy for so massive a piece of hardware. Here it is seen in 2008, just before it was completed. (Panorama by Peter McCready)

There’s something almost ironic about the disparity of scales between the Large Hadron Collider and the subatomic particles it’s built to study. The collider itself measures 17 mi. (27 km) in circumference, sits 380 ft. (116 m) below ground and cost $10 billion to build. Its detectors and magnets alone weigh tens of thousands of tons. As for the particles that are produced by the proton collisions that take place in the LHC tunnels? They are so tiny and evanescent that they flash into and out of existence in just a few trillionths of a second. But you can learn a lot in that flicker of time. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global, Science &Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

TIME Talks to the Physicists Who Found the Higgs

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 14, 2012

By JEFFREY KLUGER

The Tevatron typically produces about 10 million proton-antiproton collisions per second.

It’s not often that the world stops, cheers and generally goes nuts over a new discovery in particle physics. But that’s what happened on July 4, when physicists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced that they had at last confirmed the existence of the elusive Higgs boson, the particle that gives the universe mass. The Higgs suffuses an energy field that permeates space, and as particles move though it, they acquire a degree of mass that corresponds to their own energy level. Failing to find the Higgs would not only have meant that a new theory would have to be developed, but that the standard model of particle physics — one of the great pillars of the field for the past several decades — would fall apart.

But the Higgs was indeed run to ground, thanks to work conducted at the massive new Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which straddles the border of Switzerland and France (read more about it in the new issue of TIME, available to subscribers here). Thousands of physicists from dozens of countries contributed to the work, but there are three undisputed leaders: Joe Incandela and Fabiola Gianotti, who led the two research teams that made the discovery; and Rolf Heuer, CERN’s Director General. TIME spoke to them all by phone in Melbourne, Australia, where just three days earlier they had presented their momentous findings to the International Conference on High Energy Physics. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Confirmed: CERN discovers new particle likely to be the Higgs boson (VIDEO)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 5, 2012

Two teams of scientists at CERN have confirmed the discovery of a new subatomic particle, which may well be the elusive Higgs boson, also known as “the God particle”.

A computer screen is pictured before a scientific seminar to deliver the latest update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin, near Geneva July 4, 2012. (Reuters/Denis Balibouse)
A computer screen is pictured before a scientific seminar to deliver the latest update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin, near Geneva July 4, 2012. (Reuters/Denis Balibouse)
British physicist Peter Higgs arrives for a scientific seminar to deliver the latest update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva July 4, 2012. (Reuters/Denis Balibouse)
British physicist Peter Higgs arrives for a scientific seminar to deliver the latest update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva July 4, 2012. (Reuters/Denis Balibouse) Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global, Science &Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Higgs Boson VIDEO: A Metaphor To Explain The Particle, Or Further Confuse You

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 4, 2012


My comment : “Eastern philosophy says that only after 5th level real spiritual world starts and sooner or later science will be up to 5th level. Enlightened person does not speak about God due to practical problems but teach the way to be there. The basic of science is to explain everything with scientific proofs and without scientific proofs science does not want to speak. In the process of enlightenment, nothing to share or explain, but to realize and watch just being there and diminishing themselves. To try or start to explain they lack proof as they can not take other people there easily. I have difficulty to write more than this here.

By Become a fan sciencecara@huffingtonpost.com

Have you noticed all the buzz surrounding the Higgs boson? Do you have any idea what it is or what it means? You’re not alone.

Let me help you brush up just in time for CERN’s big announcement on July 4, 2012. What does the Higgs particle have to do with bombs and giraffes? You’ll have to click to find out. And join the conversation by leaving a comment below. Come on, talk nerdy to me!

CLICK HERE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT

The video below is a brilliant explanation of the Standard Model by Henry Reich of Minute Physics. You can subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

 Science Milestones To Expect In 2012
         

Higgs Discovery: CERN May Confirm ‘God Particle’  Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

God Particle: Why The Truth About The Higgs Boson Is Still Probably Stranger Than Fiction

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 13, 2011

Physicists at Cern, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, have announced new evidence hinting towards – although not quite confirming – the existence of the so-called God Particle, aka the Higgs Boson.

Current best guesses put the date of the Higgs’ final discovery at some time towards the end of 2012.

The elusive particle is almost impossible to see with human instruments, but theoretically makes up much of the mass of the universe and helps explain missing elements in the General Model of How Stuff Works.

If that sounds simplistic, well, it is. When it comes to the Higgs Boson, it’s hard to be anything but.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) itself is difficult enough to describe. It stretches for 27km around the French-Swiss border at a depth of 100m, and accelerates particles to near the speed of light in order to smash them together and inspect the debris. Costing more than £6bn it’s one of the largest, most expensive and most complicated experiments in the world.

But what does that really mean? Without the bits in between – the science – the LHC just sounds like a big, weird tunnel.

The problem is that reporting about anything to do with Cern is hideously difficult for non-scientists, and doing so on deadline in under 500 words is even harder. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: