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Posts Tagged ‘Hitler’

Letter To Hitler: A German Woman’s Haunting Correspondence

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 25, 2012

Letters To Hitler

The following is an excerpt from “Letters to Hitler” [Polity, $25.00]:

For Christmas 1930, thirty-two-year-old Elsa Walter, from Karlsruhe in Baden, southwest Germany, sent Hitler a book. She had written and illustrated this clothbound book by hand. She had joined the Party on 1 November and was member number 358,061.

Elsa Walter was unmarried, her family belonged to the lower middle class and had lost its savings during the period of extreme inflation in the early 1920s. Walter had attended a grammar school for girls, was interested in politics, and apparently had extensive experience in housekeeping.

In this eighty-page text entitled “The German Woman,” she sought to tell Hitler what motivated her. At the same time she assumed that many women thought the way she did. Her letter is written in fluent and clear handwriting, and points to an energetic woman with strong feelings. Sometimes the depth of these feelings clearly interfered with her punctuation. In the interest of clarity some of these grammatical mistakes have been corrected in the following extracts. Read the rest of this entry »

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Does Germany Owe Greece $95 Billion from WW II?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 20, 2011

By Sven Felix Kellerhoff / Die Welt / Worldcrunch

Die Welt

Nazi officers at the Acropolis of Athens in May 1941, one month after their troops seized the Greek capital Getty Images

BERLIN — In the current debate about the possible bankruptcy of the Greek state, one largely dormant argument has recently resurfaced with increasing frequency: the widespread damage inflicted by the Nazi regime during World War II means that Germany still owes Greece major outstanding wartime reparations.

While the claims for payment of damages are based on very real facts, one could likewise argue that over the course of 60 years or so, those claims have already been satisfied under international law.(See photos of protesters in Athens.)

What is at stake? Without having been provoked, the Wehrmacht — the Third Reich’s armed forces — took over both Greece and Yugoslavia on April 6, 1941. In both countries, German soldiers set up a brutal occupation regime. As was usually the case in European nations invaded by the Germans, the high cost of the occupation was borne by the occupied country — and the Greek economy was plundered through forced exports.

This resulted in galloping inflation and a radically lower standard of living for Greeks. Additionally, the Third Reich forced the Greek National Bank to lend Hitler’s Germany 476 million reichsmarks interest-free.

After Germany’s surrender, the Allied powers organized the Paris Conference on Reparations in the fall of 1945. Greece laid claim to $10 billion, or half the total amount of $20 billion the Soviets suggested that Germany pay.

The suffering caused to Greece by the Nazis is undeniable. Yet at the same time, human suffering cannot really be measured. Independent historians unanimously agree that the total economically measurable damages suffered by Greece as a result of the German occupation, in both absolute numbers as well as proportionate to the population, put Greece in fourth place after Poland, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.(Read about whether the Greek bailout is falling apart.)

At the Paris Conference on Reparations, Greece was finally accorded 4.5% in material German reparation and 2.7% in other forms of reparations. Practically, this meant that Greece received mainly material goods — like machines made in West Germany — worth approximately $25 million, which in today’s money amounts to as much as $2.7 billion.

However, the stipulations made at the Paris conference were all but irrelevant given that the U.S. opposed heavy economic penalties. U.S. leaders recalled what happened after World War I, when Germany’s first democracy, the Weimar Republic, was massively weakened economically by having to pay off reparations. Indeed, one of the consequences of this policy was the rise of Hitler. Read the rest of this entry »

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Adolf Hitler In Public And Private (PHOTOS): Rare And Never-Seen Photos From LIFE.com

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 28, 2010


I prefer to see Buddha’s photos. This definitely could have lots of advantages and meaning specially in this time
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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