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Posts Tagged ‘Physics’

Scientists May Have Figured Out How Ancient Egyptians Moved Huge Pyramid Stones (VIDEO)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 3, 2014

A new study offers an answer to a key question about Egypt’s ancient pyramids, which were built out of huge stone blocks more than 4,000 years ago: in the absence of modern construction equipment, how exactly were the builders of the massive structures able to move the stones across the desert to the building site?

Read the rest of this entry »

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Stephen Hawking: Space Exploration Is Key To Saving Humanity

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 12, 2013

By ALICIA CHANG  AP

Stephen Hawking, Cambridge, Jason Bye, 19/09/08

LOS ANGELES — Stephen Hawking, who spent his career decoding the universe and even experienced weightlessness, is urging the continuation of space exploration – for humanity’s sake.

The 71-year-old Hawking said he did not think humans would survive another 1,000 years “without escaping beyond our fragile planet.”

The British cosmologist made the remarks Tuesday before an audience of doctors, nurses and employees at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he toured a stem cell laboratory that’s focused on trying to slow the progression of Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Hawking was diagnosed with the neurological disorder 50 years ago while a student at Cambridge University. He recalled how he became depressed and initially didn’t see a point in finishing his doctorate. But he continued to delve into his studies.

“If you understand how the universe operates, you control it in a way,” he said. Read the rest of this entry »

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Is Light A Particle Or Wave? ‘Quantum Nonlocality’ Experiment Spotlights Dual Nature Of Light

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 6, 2012

By: Clara Moskowitz, LiveScience Senior Writer

Is light made of waves, or particles?

This fundamental question has dogged scientists for decades, because light seems to be both. However, until now, experiments have revealed light to act either like a particle, or a wave, but never the two at once.

Now, for the first time, a new type of experiment has shown light behaving like both a particle and a wave simultaneously, providing a new dimension to the quandary that could help reveal the true nature of light, and of the whole quantum world.

The debate goes back at least as far as Isaac Newton, who advocated that light was made of particles, and James Clerk Maxwell, whose successful theory of electromagnetism, unifying the forces of electricity and magnetism into one, relied on a model of light as a wave. Then in 1905, Albert Einstein explained a phenomenon called the photoelectric effect using the idea that light was made of particles called photons (this discovery won him the Nobel Prize in physics). [What’s That? Your Physics Questions Answered]

Ultimately, there’s good reason to think that light is both a particle and a wave. In fact, the same seems to be true of all subatomic particles, including electrons and quarks and even the recently discovered Higgs boson-like particle. The idea is calledwave-particle duality, and is a fundamental tenet of the theory of quantum mechanics.

Depending on which type of experiment is used, light, or any other type of particle, will behave like a particle or like a wave. So far, both aspects of light’s nature haven’t been observed at the same time. Read the rest of this entry »

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From Quanta to Qualia: What Nature Is Really Telling Us

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 17, 2012

By Deepak Chopra, Author, ‘Spiritual Solutions’; founder, The Chopra Foundation

Co-written with Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., and Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D.

What would it take to make the universe a living thing? What would it take to make it human once again, a secure home for us instead of a cold, meaningless place? What would it take to give God a future? As disconnected as these questions may seem, they are on the minds of some farseeing thinkers. And the deeper one looks, the more it appears that all three issues — a living universe, a human universe and a universe that holds a place for God — start to merge. If they actually do merge, nothing will ever be the same again. Not just science but everyday existence will be completely overturned.

There have been great physicists who were deeply religious, such as Sir Isaac Newton, or who had a religious feeling when confronting the universe, such as Albert Einstein, but God isn’t the right place to start with these huge issues. God, in fact, is a red herring. No matter who or what created the universe, it’s here now, and we have to relate to it. How? One of the oldest ideas, which can be found in every culture, holds that nature is a mirror. We relate to it by seeing ourselves, but not passively. Messages are constantly going back and forth about birth and death, about constant change and the bond between our life and nature itself. To the ancients a natural disaster — fire, flood or earthquake — showed that nature was angry. If nature was appeased, the harvest was good and the sun shone. It was unquestioned that the universe meant something, and usually it meant that a loving deity had created a special place for his children.

It’s astonishing how quickly a timeless worldview was utterly destroyed by science. The demolition project that included Darwin, Freud, Einstein and all the other quantum pioneers doesn’t need retracting. We relate to a completely mechanistic universe devoid of purpose, one that operates through random chance, perfectly meshed with evolution operating through random genetic mutations. The mirror has shattered. We no longer see ourselves, because there’s nothing meaningful to see, no purpose, no creator. Even more absurd is the notion that nature is sending us messages; from the collision of quarks to the collision of galaxies, nothing is happening “out there” to reflect human existence. Read the rest of this entry »

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‘Scientists understand only 4% of universe’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

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Interactive Panorama: Step Inside the Large Hadron Collider

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 16, 2012

 

A note to viewers: LightBox suggests viewing the panorama in full-screen mode. For visitors on a mobile device or tablet, we recommend utilizing our versions optimized for a fully immersive experience: 

iPAD version iPHONE version

Above: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two main detectors at the LHC. It weighs 12,500 tons, measures 69 ft. (21 m) in length and is a key research tool for 2,000 scientists hailing from 37 countries. It was built above ground and lowered into place—a sensible strategy for so massive a piece of hardware. Here it is seen in 2008, just before it was completed. (Panorama by Peter McCready)

There’s something almost ironic about the disparity of scales between the Large Hadron Collider and the subatomic particles it’s built to study. The collider itself measures 17 mi. (27 km) in circumference, sits 380 ft. (116 m) below ground and cost $10 billion to build. Its detectors and magnets alone weigh tens of thousands of tons. As for the particles that are produced by the proton collisions that take place in the LHC tunnels? They are so tiny and evanescent that they flash into and out of existence in just a few trillionths of a second. But you can learn a lot in that flicker of time. Read the rest of this entry »

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Higgs Boson VIDEO: A Metaphor To Explain The Particle, Or Further Confuse You

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 4, 2012


My comment : “Eastern philosophy says that only after 5th level real spiritual world starts and sooner or later science will be up to 5th level. Enlightened person does not speak about God due to practical problems but teach the way to be there. The basic of science is to explain everything with scientific proofs and without scientific proofs science does not want to speak. In the process of enlightenment, nothing to share or explain, but to realize and watch just being there and diminishing themselves. To try or start to explain they lack proof as they can not take other people there easily. I have difficulty to write more than this here.

By Become a fan sciencecara@huffingtonpost.com

Have you noticed all the buzz surrounding the Higgs boson? Do you have any idea what it is or what it means? You’re not alone.

Let me help you brush up just in time for CERN’s big announcement on July 4, 2012. What does the Higgs particle have to do with bombs and giraffes? You’ll have to click to find out. And join the conversation by leaving a comment below. Come on, talk nerdy to me!

CLICK HERE FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT

The video below is a brilliant explanation of the Standard Model by Henry Reich of Minute Physics. You can subscribe to his YouTube channel here.

 Science Milestones To Expect In 2012
         

Higgs Discovery: CERN May Confirm ‘God Particle’  Read the rest of this entry »

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Einstein was right, neutrino researchers admit

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 11, 2012

by Harumi Ozawa

Einstein's 1905 theory of special relativity described the velocity of light as the maximum speed in the cosmos

Enlarge

Picture shows Albert Einstein at a press conference in 1950. A team of scientists who last year suggested neutrinos could travel faster than light conceded Friday that Einstein was right and the sub-atomic particles are — like everything else — bound by the universe’s speed limit.

Scientists on Friday said that an experiment which challenged Einstein’s theory on the speed of light had been flawed and that sub-atomic particles — like everything else — are indeed bound by the universe’s speed limit.

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Researchers working at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) caused a storm last year when they published experimental results showing that neutrinos could out-pace light by some six kilometres (3.7 miles) per second.

The findings threatened to upend modern physics and smash a hole in Albert Einstein’s 1905 theory of special relativity, which described the velocity of light as the maximum speed in the cosmos.

But CERN now says that the earlier results were wrong and faulty kit was to blame.

“Although this result isn’t as exciting as some would have liked, it is what we all expected deep down,” said the centre’s research director Sergio Bertolucci.

“The story captured the public imagination, and has given people the opportunity to see the scientific method in action.

“An unexpected result was put up for scrutiny, thoroughly investigated and resolved in part thanks to collaboration between normally competing experiments. That’s how science moves forward.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Shourryya Ray, 16-Year-Old German Student, Dubbed ‘Genius’ For Cracking 350-Year-Old Isaac Newton Puzzle

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 28, 2012

Shourryya Ray

Sir Isaac Newton.

Shourryya Ray, a 16-year-old German student, has cracked a puzzle that has stumped mathematicians since Sir Isaac Newton first posed the problem more than 350 years ago.

Ray has won a research award and is hailed a genius for solving two fundamental particle dynamics theories that physicists have previously only been able to approximate by using computers with partial solutions. The teen’s solutions allow exact calculations of a trajectory under gravity and subject to air resistance. In other words, an item’s flight path can be calculated and predictions can be made of how the object will hit and bounce off a barrier. The two questions were first posed in the 17th and 19th centuries.

The teen first came across the problem on a visit to the Technical University in Dresden when students received raw data to evaluate the trajectory of a thrown ball — but current methods could not yield an exact result, according to The Local. Read the rest of this entry »

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The end of American atom smashing

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 2, 2012

Photo from United States Department of Energy

Photo from United States Department of Energy

After a quarter of a century, scientists operating underneath the surface of the Earth today will pull the plug on Tevatron, bringing the massive atom smasher to a screeching halt.

And just like that, another nail is hammered into the coffin for the American scientific community.

Many scientists have touted Tevatron as the most successful atom smasher in the history of physics. Since 1985 it has been operating outside of Chicago, Illinois and its technology has allowed experts to pinpoint some of the building blocks of the universe.

Abroad, however, the Large Hadron Collider, a similar structure underneath the ground at the French/Swiss border, has usurped the Tevatron as the most powerful machine of its type. Its accomplishments since its construction in 2009 have been remarkable, and American investments domestically cannot compete with the research being carried out by the LHC.

In other words, the Tevatron is no match for what lies across the pond and underneath the Earth.

“The machine has discovered what it could discover within its reach,” Gregorio Bernardi tells The Washington Post. Bernardi is a physicist at Fermilab, the Energy Department facilities that has overseen the Tevatron for years.

At 2pm this afternoon, Bernardi will pull the plug on Tevatron. “That will be it,” he tells The Post. “Then we’ll have a big party.”

Other scientists don’t necessarily see a reason to rejoice, however. Read the rest of this entry »

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Einstein Was Right All Along: ‘Faster-Than-Light’ Neutrino Was Product of Error

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 28, 2012

A discovery that could have upended a century of physics research was caused by a loose cable. Phew.
Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A woman passes behind layers of the world’s largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland on March 22, 2007.

The universe as we know it was saved today. The instrument of its salvation, and that of the very edifice of physics itself? A fiber-optic cable in a GPS receiver at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva.

The universe was first endangered back in September, when a group of CERN physicists fired a swarm of neutrinos — ghostly particles that don’t give a fig about objects in their path—through a mountain to a receiver beneath Italy’s Apennine Mountains, located 450 miles (724 km) away. Since the mountain might as well not have been there, the neutrinos should have moved at the speed of light the entire way — no slower, and definitely no faster, since, as Albert Einstein pointed out, nothing in the universe can do that.

(MORE: Was Einstein Wrong? A Faster-Than-Light Neutrino May Be Saying Yes)

But according to the Apennine receivers, the neutrinos did go faster — not by much, just by 60 nanoseconds, or .0025% of the time it would have taken a light beam to make the trip. But being a little faster than light is like being a little dead; even a tiny bit changes everything. In this case, what the experiment would have changed is the very foundation of Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which is itself the foundation of more than a century of physics, and fundamental to our entire understanding of the universe. So people were concerned. Read the rest of this entry »

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CERN’s Loose Cable To Blame For Proving Einstein Wrong

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 26, 2012

Note to Einstein naysayers – check your equipment before trying to prove the chief geek wrong.

A loose wire may be to blame for CERN’s claim late last year that Einstein’s theory of special relativity, proposed in 1905, was actually incorrect.

The theory states that nothing in the universe can travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

It took just 2.3 milliseconds for light to travel between the Geneva and Gran Sasso laboratories.

CERN showed that the accepted speed of light could be broken by 60 nanoseconds, or more precisely that neutrinos arrived 60 nanoseconds too early than if they were travelling at the speed of light, breaking the speed of light itself by 0.00248%. Two experiments reached the same conclusion.

The Telegraph reports that a loose wire at CERN might mean Einstein is not wrong. Read the rest of this entry »

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Einstein Was Right All Along: ‘Faster-Than-Light’ Neutrino Was Product of Error

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 22, 2012

A discovery that could have upended a century of physics research was caused by a loose cable. Phew.
Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A woman passes behind layers of the world’s largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland on March 22, 2007.

The universe as we know it was saved today. The instrument of its salvation, and that of the very edifice of physics itself? A fiber-optic cable in a GPS receiver at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) near Geneva.

The universe was first endangered back in September, when a group of CERN physicists fired a swarm of neutrinos — ghostly particles that don’t give a fig about objects in their path—through a mountain to a receiver beneath Italy’s Apennine Mountains, located 450 miles (724 km) away. Since the mountain might as well not have been there, the neutrinos should have moved at the speed of light the entire way — no slower, and definitely no faster, since, as Albert Einstein pointed out, nothing in the universe can do that. Read the rest of this entry »

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Stephen Hawking: We Should Colonise Mars But Encountering Aliens ‘Will Not End Well’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 8, 2012

Professor Stephen Hawking told listeners of BBC Today programme that he thought humans would almost definitely colonise Mars, but he warned against encouraging alien encounters.

As Stephen Hawking’s 70th birthday approaches, the scientist who was told he wouldn’t live past 40 answered some of the public’s questions focusing on humanity’s destiny to inhabit outer space.

A bit of a futurist, Hawking’s latest book, George’s Secret Key To The Universe is an explanation of the world aimed at children, a lesson for the next generation.

It’s not the first time Hawking has advised people to“reach out to the stars.” The physicist has long been outspoken on the subject of humanity’s intergalactic future.

He was the first quadriplegic to experience zero gravity, after a sub orbital space flight in 2009. At the time, he justified the £100,000 needed (and donated by Richard Branson) by saying:

“Many people have asked me why I am taking this flight. I am doing it for many reasons.

“First of all, I believe that life on Earth is at an ever-increasing risk of being wiped out by a disaster such as sudden nuclear war, a genetically engineered virus, or other dangers.

“I think the human race has no future if it doesn’t go into space. I therefore want to encourage public interest in space.”

This anxiety was picked up again in Hawking’s answer on the Today programme. He was asked “Do you think the human race will survive all potential disasters and eventually colonise the stars?”

His response reflects worries of biological and particularly nuclear warfare:

“It is possible that the human race could become extinct, but it is not inevitable.

“I think it is almost certain that a disaster such as nuclear war or global warming will befall the Earth within a thousand years.”

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Stephen Hawking’s 70th birthday: 17 things you need to know about the physicist

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 8, 2012

Happy Birthday to Professor Stephen Hawking, who today celebrates his 70th birthday – nearly fifty years after he was first diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

Here are 17 things you need to know about the most famous theoretical physicist in the world.

1) Born in Oxford on January 8 1942 – 300 years after the death of astronomer Galileo Galilei – Professor Hawking grew up in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

2) After being diagnosed with a rare form of motor neurone disease – amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – at the age of 22, Hawking was given just a few years to live.

3) Hawking is as much a celebrity as he is a scientist, having appeared on The Simpsons, Star Trek and having provided narration for a British Telecom commercial that was later sampled on a Pink Floyd album.

4) He had a difficult time at the local public school and was persecuted as a “swot” who was more interested in jazz, classical music and debating than sport and pop. Read the rest of this entry »

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