Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without – Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Piprahawa’

Ariel Lewin, an American Ethnographer at Harvard University on Buddha birthplace

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 15, 2012

Ariel Lewin, an American Ethnographer at Harvard University shared her thoughts on Buddhist pilgrame to Lumbini archaeological site and the Budhha birth place also. She is a practising Buddhist and is of the opinion that Buddha’s birth-site is where the Ashokan pillar stands today, that is to say, present day Lumbini of Nepal:

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TALKING THE BUDDHA BIRTH PLACE : MISINFORMING PEOPLE TO GLORIFY A NATION IS WRONG

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 16, 2012

[ Below today we re-post an article with a video taken this morning of a professor of history from Bhuvaneshowr, Orissa India. The Buddha birth place controversy was brought out of Orissa in 1928. But the speaker in the video below, Professor Kailash Chandra Dash, who himself comes from Orissa, says those were forged (his)stories to glorify Orissan as well as Indian peoples. And he added that the Indian scholars and historians should have interpreted historical information or data more scientifically, rather than any ‘nationalistic zeal’. Prof. Dash says, the birth place of Buddha is present day Lumbini of Nepal, not in any part of India. For more please watch the video.- Editor (Himalayan Voice)]

By Kailash Chandra Dash
The two edicts from Paderia and Nigliva were edited by G.Buhler on the basis of the inked estampages furnished by their discoverer, Dr. A. A. Fuhrer who found the second in March 1895 and the first in December 18961. Both came from the Nepal Terai, where Nigliva was situated 38 miles north west of the Uska Bazar station of the Bengal and the North-Western Railway in the Nepalese tahsil Taulihva of the Zillah Bataul. Paderia was two miles north of the Nepalese tahsil Bhagvanpur of the same Zillah and according to Dr Fuhrer`s estimate about thirteen miles from Nigliva2. Both were incised on mutilated stone pillars and the Paderia edict which was found three feet below the surface of the ground was in a state of perfect preservation while that of Nigliva had suffered a great deal on the left side and had lost the first five letters of line three as well as the first seven of line four3.

Niglihawa pillar. Image Google

Niglihawa pillar. Image Google

Aftetr about thirty-one years of the discovery and publication of these records on Ashoka a copy of Paderia edict (The so-called Rummindei inscription) was found in Kapileswar of Bhubaneswar, the present capital of Odisha4. This stone inscription(Silaphalaka) was brought to public notice by Haran Chandra Chakaldar of Calcutta university and it was procured in about March 1928 by Birendranath Ray for his museum at Puri from the village of Kapileswar5. It created a belief that Buddha was born in Kapiavastu which was near Kapileswar of Bhubaneswar as the said edict contains the message of the birthplace of Gautam Buddha in Lumbini which was not far away from Kapilavastu. Thus this inscription from Kapileswar of Bhubaneswar arrested the attention of the historians and the archaeologists of India and abroad. In this paper I have proposed to make a comparative study of the two sets of Ashokan edicts from Paderia and Nigliva with Kapileswar inscription to justify the legitimacy of the inscriptions found from Nepal and to establish the fake nature of the Kapileswar grant on the basis of new findings and interpretations.

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