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Posts Tagged ‘Religion And Science’

‘Dear Einstein, Do Scientists Pray?’ Asks Sixth Grader

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 1, 2014

Einstein On The Porch

“Do scientists pray?”

That’s the question that occupied the thoughts of a sixth-grade Sunday school class at The Riverside Church, and who better to pose it to than one of the best scientific minds of our time, Albert Einstein?

A young girl named Phyllis penned a polite and inquisitive note to the great physicist, and she was probably surprised to receive a considerate reply. The exchange was published in the book “Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children,” edited by Alice Calaprice.

She wrote:

January 19, 1936 My dear Dr. Einstein,

We have brought up the question: Do scientists pray? in our Sunday school class. It began by asking whether we could believe in both science and religion. We are writing to scientists and other important men to try and have our own question answered.

We will feel greatly honored if you will answer our question: Do scientists pray, and what do they pray for?

We are in the sixth grade, Miss Ellis’s class.

Respectfully yours,

Phyllis Read the rest of this entry »

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Science and Religion: The Views of Two Religious Scientists

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 4, 2012

By Mario Livio, Astrophysicist, Space Telescope Science Institute

2012-07-31-hs200312asm.jpg
Figure 1. Part of the Hubble Deep Field-1995, showing Supernova SN 2002dd.

Jacob Bekenstein and David Eichler are both world-renowned astrophysicists. Bekenstein, winner of the 2012 Wolf Prize, is best known for his work on black hole thermodynamics, and for the formulation of a theory known as TeVeS, that attempted to explain galactic observations without a need for dark matter. Eichler is known for numerous works on gamma-ray bursts, cosmic rays, and pulsars. They are also religious Jews. I have known Bekenstein and Eichler for decades, but I suddenly realized that I had never actually talked to them about whether they see any conflict between their religious beliefs and their scientific views. I was happy to discover that neither of them had any objections to openly discussing their opinions.

Eichler explained to me right away that he believed that the universe is governed by the laws of physics.

“What is God’s role, then?” I asked.

“For all we know, God created the laws of nature,” he replied, “so religion in this sense does not contradict science at all.”

“But,” I insisted, “did God’s work end, then, with formulating the laws?”

“No,” Eichler explained. “As you know from quantum mechanics, the laws of physics proclaim their own incompleteness, and that leaves, as one logical possibility, plenty of room for God to intervene.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Who or What Is God?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 26, 2012

By Peter Baksa, Investigative Journalist/Entreprenuer/Author of ‘The Point of Power’

“The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion, as well as, all serious endeavour. He who never had this experience, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced, there is a something that the mind cannot grasp; whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly; this is religiousness. In this sense I am religious.” — Albert Einstein

The laws of physics have conspired to make collisions of atoms produce plants, trees, animals and humans. In fact, these laws produced collections of atoms that don’t just obey Newton’s laws in a passive way. Some jump, mate, run and think. The laws of physics, working through Darwin’s natural selection, have produced these gigantic collections of apparently purposeful beings who look as though they have been designed. Once Darwin determined how to get complicated, designed beings from the simplest of forms, he gave us an intellectual foothold to begin to see a process that we refer to as evolution. We know since 1859 how this all happens.

Math and science use principle-centered, complex frameworks to describe and understand phenomena on all scales of time and space. Reality, on the other hand, operates at all intervals simultaneously. Our existence, as we see it, is an illusion.

“We are spirit having human experiences not the other way around.”

A starving child, longing for food, has no clock to measure the movement of the sun and the earth around their shared center of mass. Looking down from my high-rise in Chicago I often look over the hundreds of people mulling about on the beach, each existing from a particular point, their own universe if you will. A fly’s eyes have hundreds of different facets. It is able to detect the briefest flickers of movement, perceiving reality under a completely different guise than we humans.The mind of an Alzheimer’s patient cannot use the human construct of time. For such a person, the chronology of existence is broken, living without the element of time or memory to assist in formulating their reality. Time is an illusion, as is space. Read the rest of this entry »

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My Conversation With the Dalai Lama: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 15, 2012

By Arianna Huffington

At a lunch in the crypt at St. Paul’s before the Dalai Lama received the Templeton Prize today, I was seated next to Canon Mark Oakley. “We need to move beyond relevance to resonance,” he said.

It was a call to move beyond the shallows to the depths, beyond the passing novelties of the moment to the echoes of the soul. The Canon summed up the vicious circle we too often find ourselves caught in: “We are,” he said, “spending money we don’t have on things we don’t want in order to impress people we don’t like.”

To find the peace of mind that alone can replace this aimless search that has led to an epidemic of stress, anxiety, and drugs — legal and illegal — the Dalai Lama is looking to science (specifically neuroscience) to convince a skeptical increasingly-secular society of the power of contemplation and compassion to change our lives and our world.

As he wrote in his 2005 book, The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality: Read the rest of this entry »

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The Dalai Lama, Arianna Huffington Interview: His Holiness Discusses Compassion, Science, Religion And Sleep

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 15, 2012

His Holiness the Dalai Lama sat down with Arianna Huffington at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London to celebrate his Templeton Prize, and discuss the importance of a productive conversation between spirituality and science.

The Dalai Lama’s role in fostering positive interactions between religion and science is one of the reasons why he was honored by the prize.

As the Templeton Foundation notes: “For decades, Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama has vigorously focused on the connections between the investigative traditions of science and Buddhism as a way to better understand and advance what both disciplines might offer the world.”

Arianna Huffington also asked HH Dalai Lama about the importance of sleep; the epidemic of stress, anxiety, and drugs — legal and illegal; and compassion, which is emphasized in the practice of Buddhism.

The Templeton Prize comes with a cash award of $1.7 million dollars, which His Holiness has donated to Save The Children.

Read the transcript of the interview below:

Arianna Huffington: You have been working with neuroscientists for many years now. What do you hope to achieve through this collaboration between science and spirituality?

His Holiness the Dalai Lama: Two purpose: One purpose, up to date scientific research mainly based on matters. Now, later part of 20th century, and now beginning of this 21st century, now scientific research field now expanding, including human emotions, mind. That’s one purpose. The reason we cannot explain fully what humans are thinking about these thing just on research on brain alone. That’s one purpose. The second purpose: on the basis of scientific finding, more awareness, the how importance of our emotion for our health and healthy society and family. Now, through training of mind, how much can develop our health, our healthy society. So, and me personally, my main effort to promote these values, not through religious field, but without touching religion, simply use our common sense and common experience and then scientific finding, so to make more awareness to public. My main hope is eventually, in modern education field, introduce education about warm-heartedness, not based on religion, but based on common experience and a common sort of sense, and then scientific finding. So in that respect, you see, I’ve found a lot of useful information from scientific research work. Read the rest of this entry »

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Did an Outside Entity Create the Universe?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 15, 2011

 

 Scientist, theoretician and author, ‘Biocentrism’ 

“Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth? … When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy?” –Job 38:4,7

Was there a creator?

As a child I found myself playing on the center of God’s stage. From some hidden celestial vantage point, so I thought, I was being scrutinized and watched by the Supreme Creator, perhaps almost as narrowly as I, as a medical student with a microscope, would one day scrutinize the cells growing in a Petri dish. But that was long ago, before I had seen micrographs of DNA, or the tracks of matter and antimatter created in a bubble chamber by the collision of high-energy particles. But as I became engaged upon the task of squeezing 300 years of scientific achievement into a few convolutions of brain tissue, it became increasingly clear — in my new sophistication — that there was no need for a creator.

After four decades of scientific study, I have learned that there are natural explanations for the evolution of the stars, planets and even life. There are hundreds of textbooks and scientific journals that describe in detail how hadrons and leptons assemble into atoms and molecules, and how they in turn assemble into ants, musicians and football players. As a scientist, I was taught that an outside creator isn’t needed to complete this mechanical explanation of life and the universe.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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War of the Worldviews: Let’s Talk God

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 24, 2011

By Deepak Chopra

In this series of posts about science and spirituality, I’ve left God for last, even though God has become the hottest topic as we struggle toward the future. The arguments against belief in God have been stridently raised by a small band of scientific atheists — their avowed leader, Richard Dawkins, has become a household name. In our recent book, “War of the Worldviews,” my co-author, Caltech physicist Leonard Mlodinow, doesn’t pursue the atheist line. His worldview is scientific, but Leonard holds a view that is much more defensible than atheism:

“While science often casts doubt on spiritual beliefs and doctrines insofar as they make representations about the physical world, science does not — and cannot — conclude that God is an illusion.”

I believe that spirituality can take hints from modern science to actually support the existence of God. Some of these hints have emerged from quantum physics, which long ago showed that the seemingly solid, convincing world of matter and energy actually derives from a highly uncertain, invisible realm that existed before time and space. Is this the domain of God? If so, it can’t be the God of Genesis, a human-like figure sitting above the clouds who created heaven and earth in seven days. I think a new and expanded spirituality can deliver a God that is the same as pure intelligence, creativity and consciousness. Such a God is our source without being human — a source from which all possibilities emerge and flow. Quite a number of credentialed scientists are thinking in the same direction without necessarily being religious. It would explain a lot about the cosmos if we fit into a living, conscious universe.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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War of The Worldviews: Where Science and Spirituality Agree and Disagree

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 13, 2011

Leonard describes Einstein’s theory of relativity, and quantum theory, and how they are combined to create a scientific theory of how the universe began and evolved. He describes the impressive agreement between the theoretical predictions based on this picture and actual observations of the heavens made by astronomers. Deepak proposes a creative first cause that preceded the infinitesimally brief Planck epoch (10-43 seconds) following the Big Bang. He suggests that since the laws of nature and perhaps space and time emerged after the Planck epoch, any understanding of the pre-created universe remains outside the scope of objective science.

 

It is said that real spiritual world starts when science ends. According to this science and real spiritual world can not go together.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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A Cosmic Book With Human Insight

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 13, 2011

By Deepak Chopra

I found my eyes opened, along with my mind, by an intriguing book, The View from the Center of the Universe, by Joel R. Primack, a distinguished physicist at the University of California Santa Cruz, and his wife, Nancy Ellen Abrams, an excellent writer. There have been a spate of books extending our concept of the universe and how human beings fit into it. In an earlier post I listed some of the most exciting concepts that are potentially revolutionizing cosmology, among them, that we live in a conscious universe, that the universe is a living thing, and that evolution drives the cosmos. Primack and Abrams continue to explore such ideas in their newest bookThe New Universe and the Human Future.

But they also campaign persuasively for a meaningful universe, contending that we no longer live in the ancient or medieval conception of the cosmos and not the empty, meaningless universe of Newton. “The lack of a meaningful universe is a modern mental handicap.” They are not aiming to reclaim old religious ideas, however. “There is a real dissonance between the colorful, volatile, science-expanded world we actually inhabit and the monotonously recycled language that religions use to describe ‘ultimate reality.'” So what kind of meaning do Primack and Abrams find in the cosmos? Their book answers this question through a totally engaging and very readable exploration of “the new universe” explained by quantum physics and contemporary astrophysics.

In a nutshell, “… the Big Bang powers us all, galaxies and human beings alike, in different ways on our respective size-scales.” This last phrase refers to how nature operates differently depending on how big or small the scale is, moving from the subatomic to the universal. Primack and Abrams put great store in the unique scale of the human world and how our minds have turned to explain ourselves as well as the cosmos. They continue, “Every one of us is entitled to say, ‘I am what the expanding universe is doing here and now.'” This startling declaration isn’t solipsism. In fact, it echoes a sentence I remember from a noted Indian guru, who said, “You need to realize that the entire universe collaborated to create this exact second and everything that is happening to you right now.” Bringing such a perspective into practical life, as Primack and Abrams want to do, is not easy. Read the rest of this entry »

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Why God’s Future Depends on Science

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 22, 2011

Deepak Chopra

Deepak Chopra

Posted: March 21, 2011 08:37 PM

We are in the scientific age and due to this reason God’s future depends on science. However, another school says that later or sooner the achievement of science will be up to fifth level and real spiritual world starts from fifth level. So for this school, the first perspective not applicable­.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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A Reasonable Argument for God’s Existence

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 7, 2011


Logic and reality could not meet always.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Reconciling Science and Religion: How Did These Great Minds Do It?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 6, 2010


Some saints say that science could have knowledge up to fifth level and only after that real spiritual world starts. That could be the reason that still lots of things still remain mystery for science.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Religion and Science: Finding Their Kindred Spirits

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 24, 2010


It could be better if science and religion could go together but it could not. They have their own ethic and limitations.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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