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Posts Tagged ‘Roger Penrose’

Stephen Hawking’s The 71st Birthday

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 9, 2013

Stephen Hawking, Cambridge, Jason Bye, 19/09/08Sitting in a wheel chair since the age of 28 due to paralysis because of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) related motor neuron disease, Stephen William Hawking, (born 8 January 1942) became world renowned theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author. He can’t speak thus he communicates through a speech generating device with a vocal supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

His doctor told him that he won’t survive long because in the world ALS survival for more than 10 years after diagnosis is uncommon. however now he is 71 years.

Among his significant scientific works have been a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularities theorems in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set forth a cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He is a vocal supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of thePresidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. Hawking was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009. Read the rest of this entry »

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Will the “God Particle” Replace God?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

By Deepak Chopra

If you went to church in the 18th century, you would have heard God described as a celestial clockmaker who had wound up the universe and left it to run itself. Today, the wind-up is the Big Bang and the clock’s parts are subatomic particles. But the problem of creating matter out of emptiness remains the same.

How does matter form from the immaterial? What gives particles their mass, and how do they stick together? The physicists at the CERN facility in Europe are busy using the massive multibillion-dollar Large Hadron Collider to try to answer those questions by hunting for the elusive Higgs boson, the so-called “God particle.”

The search takes place between the visible and the invisible. The hypothetical Higgs boson is a virtual particle, which means it can be coaxed to enter spacetime for the tiniest flash of a millisecond. It operates at the Planck scale, which is millions of times smaller than the nucleus of an atom. Read the rest of this entry »

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Did God Discover the God Particle?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2012

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., FACP, Rudolph Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Chapman University

The possible discovery of the Higgs boson would not have been splashed across every major media if the tag “God particle” weren’t attached to it. Physicists hate the term, but they love the publicity. There are huge government grants at stake as well as the prestige of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland. After you read the headline, however, there’s little doubt that a general reader cannot actually grasp what a Higgs boson is (or a large hadron accelerator, either).

If you watch enough PBS programs and listen to a few physicists, some clarity emerges that a non-physicist can understand. The Higgs boson discovery adds validation to a mathematical model of force fields in the universe. It attaches a real particle to an expectation, the expectation that buried inside force fields was the key to why subatomic particles have mass. Mass would be acquired as a particle meets with resistance when it moves through the vacuum of space, a kind of “molasses” that slows it down.

This molasses is very elusive. It took many billions of colliding protons in the huge CERN accelerator, backed up by 100,000 computers around the world, to analyze the data before the discovery seemed real. Even then, most physicists are guarded about whether this new particle actually is a Higgs boson. They are equally guarded about whether its properties will uphold the Standard Model of force fields or in fact create more problems. Read the rest of this entry »

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Stephen Hawking’s Grand Book, But Where Is the Design?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 8, 2010

Huffington Post

by Deepak Chopra and Menas Kafatos
Fletcher Jones Professor of Computational Physics,
Dean College of Science Chapman University

Stephen Hawking occupies a position in popular culture comparable only to Einstein’s eminence sixty years ago: he is our last wise man speaking with the total authority of advanced science. Until his new book, The Grand Design, appeared, co-authored with Caltech physics professor (and adept writer) Leonard Mlodinow, Hawking had left open the whisper of a possibility that God might be allowed to survive scientific scrutiny. Einstein had a strong feeling for the presence of awe and wonder at the far horizon of the cosmos and saw evidence for the existence of a unifying, rational presence in the mathematical order of the cosmos. But since then the universe of theoretical physics has become random, complex, paradoxical, and barren of divine presence. Therefore, when Hawking made worldwide news recently by declaring that “it is not necessary to invoke God…to set the Universe going,” a blow was struck for the noisy camp of atheists while the world of devout believers had one more reason–this time a crushing one –to consider science as the enemy of religion. Read the rest of this entry »

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Michio Kaku Interview By Deepak Chopra

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 17, 2010

Michio Kaku interview on Deepak Chopra Wellness Radio-Sirius XM September 19, 2009

Deepak Chopra: My very special guest today is Dr. Michio Kaku and Dr. Kaku is a theoretical physicist and best-selling author and popular writer of science. He’s the co-founder of string field theory which is a co-branch of string theory and continues Einstein’s search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified field theory. Dr. Kaku has popularized science as no one else that I know. He’s appeared on Discovery Channel, BBC, ABC, the Science Channel, CNN, just to name a few. He has many many publications, many books, he’s a professor here in New York. He holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York where he has taught for over 25 years. He’s been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton as well as New York University. Welcome Dr. Kaku!

MK: Deepak, it’s a real honor to be on your show.

DC: And you know we’re going to talk about the unified field theory and we’re also going to talk about of course your book towards the end of our show I want to ask you a few questions about the world of consciousness in nature. How does nature function with or without consciousness? I was walking New York City one day and saw your book Physics of the Impossible in a window and I was totally taken up with how you started that book. You said “To deny the impossible… you deny the impossible at your peril,” or something like that. What do you mean? Read the rest of this entry »

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