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Happy International Women’s day

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 6, 2015

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world.

History:

For more than a century, March 8th has been the day to commemorate and celebrate the fight of working class and revolutionary women for a better deal and a socialist society. Its origins are in the struggles for equal pay and decent conditions amongst women in the USA in the 19th century.

On March 8, 1857, garment workers in New York City marched and picketed, demanding improved working conditions, a ten hour day, and equal rights for women. Their ranks were broken up by the police. Fifty-one years later, March 8, 1908, their sisters in the needle trades in New York marched again, honouring the 1857 march, demanding the vote, and an end to sweatshops and child labour. The police were present on this occasion too.

A conference in 1910 of socialist women involved in the Second International, adopted a proposal of the German revolutionary fighter, Klara Zetkin, to establish an International Women’s Day. Russian women began to observe this on the last Sunday in February, according to the pre-revolutionary Julien calendar.

Womens Day New York

In 1917 this was the day the working women of Petrograd literally started a revolution. In protest at rising prices and food shortages, they filed into the centre of the city, calling on all  fellow workers to join them. This was actually March 8th according to the (Gregorian) calendar used elsewhere in the world.’Down with hunger!’ ‘Down with the war!’ Hunger was claiming the lives of thousands of children, along with those of older men and women, and the very sick and very poor. The First World War was claiming the lives of millions of farm labourers and workers at the front. The ‘February Revolution’ of 1917, which threw off the yoke of Csarism across the Russian Empire, was the precursor of the victorious socialist revolution of October in the same year.

Scenario in the 21st Century:

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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Happy International Women’s day 2013

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2013

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world.

History:

For more than a century, March 8th has been the day to commemorate and celebrate the fight of working class and revolutionary women for a better deal and a socialist society. Its origins are in the struggles for equal pay and decent conditions amongst women in the USA in the 19th century.

On March 8, 1857, garment workers in New York City marched and picketed, demanding improved working conditions, a ten hour day, and equal rights for women. Their ranks were broken up by the police. Fifty-one years later, March 8, 1908, their sisters in the needle trades in New York marched again, honouring the 1857 march, demanding the vote, and an end to sweatshops and child labour. The police were present on this occasion too.

A conference in 1910 of socialist women involved in the Second International, adopted a proposal of the German revolutionary fighter, Klara Zetkin, to establish an International Women’s Day. Russian women began to observe this on the last Sunday in February, according to the pre-revolutionary Julien calendar.

In 1917 this was the day the working women of Petrograd literally started a revolution. In protest at rising prices and food shortages, they filed into the centre of the city, calling on all  fellow workers to join them. This was actually March 8th according to the (Gregorian) calendar used elsewhere in the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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NASA seeing red: $2.5 billion Mars rover to dig for proof of life

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 8, 2012

An artist's conception of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. (AFP Photo / NASA)

An artist’s conception of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. (AFP Photo / NASA)

NASA’s make-or-break Mars mission has entered its landing phase on Monday morning. While the Curiosity rover attempts to land using a never-attempted sky crane, engineers back on Earth have no control over the pre-programmed sequence.

The touchdown is scheduled for 5:31 GMT.

NASA engineers will have to wait at least 14 minutes before learning the fate of Curiosity. That is if the Odyssey orbiter circling Mars is at the right spot in the sky to catch the rover’s signal. If not, it could take up to eight hours to get the final answer on the rover’s fate.

The $2.5 billion Mars Science Laboratory “could arguably be the most important event in the history of planetary exploration,” said Doug McCuistion, director of Mars exploration at NASA’s headquarters in Washington, DC.

The trickiest part of the mission, currently on its 8 months since launching in 2011, is the landing. Not only does it involve delivering the NASA’s largest-ever one-ton payload safely to the Martian surface, it will also attempt a new kind of landing sequence involving a guided entry, a supersonic 16-meter parachute, firing eight rocket thrusters during the descent and, finally, the sky crane.

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Lead Flight Director David Oh speaks to members of the media in the Mission Control room ahead of the landing of the Mars rover Curiosity. (AFP Photo / Robyn Beck)
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Lead Flight Director David Oh speaks to members of the media in the Mission Control room ahead of the landing of the Mars rover Curiosity. (AFP Photo / Robyn Beck)

A crane hovering some seven meters in the sky after touchdown will lower Curiosity to the surface of Mars. The approach was chosen over a traditional lander or inflatable cushioning due to the size of the rover. The sky crane trick avoids risks like tilting the platform, or mechanical damage from the clouds of dust and debris kicked up by rocket engines. But the sky crane technology couldn’t be fully field-tested on Earth, since it was designed for the atmosphere and gravity of Mars. Read the rest of this entry »

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Cheryl Cole Wows In White Victoria Beckham At What To Expect Premiere

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 23, 2012

Cheryl Cole marked her recent foray into the world of cinema (appearing as herself on a talent show judging panel for the movie What To Expect When You’re Expecting) by turning up at the film’s London premiere in an unusual Victoria Beckham design.

cheryl cole white dress

The dress is described by Victoria Beckham on her site as a “blonde/white techno stretch and silk crepe cut out floorlength dress” and we must say it suits the singer really well. [Although a commenter has directed our attention to the less-than-chic frayed hem – good spot!]

In terms of accessories, the earrings and ring are by Garrard and the clutch is Sergio Rossi – the shoes are apparently Giuseppi Zanotti but they’re not exactly getting much air time so we can’t give you any further details on that front. Read the rest of this entry »

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Britain’s Got Talent’s Alesha Dixon: ‘Simon Cowell ‘Got Off’ On Stealing Me From Strictly’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 25, 2012

Alesha Dixon is adamant she was not forced to leave Strictly Come Dancing by Simon Cowell – but she does think the media mogul “got off” on stealing her from the BBC for Britain’s Got Talent.

The new Britain’s Got Talent judge was asked how she felt about Simon deliberately poaching her to cause controversy.

She tells The Mirror: “I’m sure he got off on that. But I’m a 33-year-old woman who makes her own decisions. It makes it sound like he stole me and I had no choice. I’m not a puppet.”

But Alesha does admit that her mum and nan urged her to accept the offer. Read the rest of this entry »

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Afghanistan Shootings: Calls For Public Trial Of US Soldier Accused Over Civilian Deaths (Pictures)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 12, 2012


The term “terrorist” is not like 2+2=4. This depends upon time, situation and condition. The same person and incident could be terrorist for particular group/s and patriotic for another:

Afghan politicians are demanding that the US soldier allegedly involved in the killings of 16 civilians faces a public trial.

The call came in a statement from the lower house of the Afghanistan Parliament as the Taliban promised revenge for theattack that left nine children, three women and four men dead. At least five more were injured.

In a statement issued on Monday, the Afghan parliament said: “We seriously demand and expect that the government of the United States punish the culprits and try them in a public trial before the people of Afghanistan”, Sky News reported.

Afghanistan’s President Hamid Karzai described the attacks as “impossible to forgive”, saying in a statement:

“When Afghan people are killed deliberately by US forces this action is murder and terror and an unforgivable action.”

The Taliban’s promise of reprisals came in a statement on their website, accusing “sick-minded US savages” of the attack and vowing to “take revenge from the invaders and the savage murderers for every single martyr.

“A large number from amongst the victims are innocent children, women and the elderly, martyred by the American barbarians who mercilessly robbed them of their precious lives and drenched their hands with their innocent blood,” the statement continued. Read the rest of this entry »

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International Women’s Day: Protest And Celebration Around The World (PICTURES)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2012

International Women’s Day has been marked across the globe with political protest as well as celebration and solemn observation.

In Britain, Karren Brady, vice-chairman of West Ham United and Alex Wek, rights campaigner and model, whose family fled South Sudan following the civil war, joined Nick Clegg in opening the London Stock Exchange.

Prime Minister David Cameron met charities and campaigners to discuss how to deal with the problem of stalking. Blogging for the Huffington Post UK, Prime Minister Cameron made a call to arms, writing:

“It is despicable that in the 21st century so many medieval practices and attitudes remain. And it is appalling that time and again, this is shoved under the carpet. People turn a blind eye and a culture of shame and secrecy is perpetuated. Read the rest of this entry »

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YouTube Video Views Hit 4 Billion Per Day

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 27, 2012

By Alexei Oreskovic

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – YouTube, Google Inc’s video website, is streaming 4 billion online videos every day, a 25 percent increase in the past eight months, according to the company.

The jump in video views comes as Google pushes YouTube beyond the personal computer, with versions of the site that work on smartphones and televisions, and as the company steps up efforts to offer more professional-grade content on the site.

According to the company, roughly 60 hours of video is now uploaded to YouTube every minute, compared with the 48 hours of video uploaded per minute in May.

YouTube, which Google acquired for $1.65 billion in 2006, represents one of Google’s key opportunities to generate new sources of revenue outside its traditional Internet search advertising business.

Last week, Google said that its business running graphical “display” ads – many of which are integrated alongside YouTube videos – was generating $5 billion in revenue on an annualized run rate basis. Read the rest of this entry »

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9 Countries In the Nuclear Weapons Club

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 9, 2012


Nuclear power was developed in the name of establishi­ng peace and now this is threatenin­g the whole human race. Current existing amounts of nuclear power are enough to destroy not a single earth but dozens of equivalent earths. What will happen if the nuclear power will get into terrorists­’ hand? This is today’s one of the biggest concerns for world leaders: http://ram­kshrestha.­wordpress.­com/2011/0­3/27/overc­oming-new-­decade-cha­llenges/:

Many historians argue that the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were a turning point in mankind’s history, events that marked the beginning of humanity’s ability to instantly self-annihilate. After the United States had its first successful nuclear test in 1945, the nuclear club was soon expanded to include tests by the Soviet Union (1949), the United Kingdom (1952), France (1960), China (1964), India (1974), Pakistan (1998), and North Korea (2006).

As of today, there are nine countries generally recognized to own nuclear weapons, with Iran actively seeking to join this group. In order of the estimated size of the nuclear arsenal, from largest to smallest, are: Russia, the United States, France, China, the United Kingdom, Pakistan, India, Israel and North Korea. Notably, the five members of the Security Council (Russia, the United States, France, China and the United Kingdom) were the first developers of nuclear weapons and currently have the five largest nuclear stockpiles in the world.

2012-01-06-Nucleardistribution.jpg

While these nine countries are generally recognized as owning nuclear weapons, that doesn’t mean that they are the only countries that possess nuclear weapons. Countries that are not officially recognized as being part of the nuclear club, such as Belgium, Germany, Italy, Turkey and the Netherlands, deploy and store American nuclear weapons as part of NATO agreements. Other non-nuclear countries such as South Korea, Canada and Greece previously had similar arrangements with the United States.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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‘X Factor’ Winner Melanie Amaro: Song Performances (VIDEOS)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 23, 2011

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Arab Spring One Year On: What Happened, What Changed?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 17, 2011

One year ago today, Mohamed Bouazizi set himself alight in Tunisia. It was a personal protest that had huge ramifications not only for his homeland, but the entire region. This was the incident which triggered the demonstrations that spread from Tunisia into Egypt, Libya, Syria and beyond. This was the start of the Arab Spring.

At Bouazizi’s funeral 5,000 marchers chanted: “Farewell, Mohammed, we will avenge you. We weep for you today, we will make those who caused your death weep.”

For all their passion, no one expected what happened next: 12 months of intense protests, violence and revolution across North Africa and the Middle East, which brought down governments and resulted in thousands of deaths.

But 12 months later what has the impact really been? Which governments have fallen, which are on the brink – and which, if any, are stronger than ever? Was the Arab Spring really a movement – or was it always an invention of the press?

And with protests breaking out in Russia, Greece, China and even New York throughout 2011, as well as in the Arab world, has the spirit of the Spring spilled become a truly global phenomenon?

IN PICTURES: A Photographic History Of The Arab Spring

ARAB SPRING TIMELINE: How The Arab Spring Unfolded

As the Arab Spring marks a year of protest, we look back at what happened, and what changed.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Voyager 1: Nasa Probe About To Leave Solar System And Enter Inter-Stellar Space

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 7, 2011

The Voyager 1 probe, launched by Nasa in 1977, is on the cusp of leaving the solar system – the first man-made object to do so.

The spacecraft, which has already travelled 11 billion miles since its launch, will soon enter a region that astronomers call inter-stellar space, where the high-speed solar winds diminish and the magnetic winds of deep space intensify.

The probe, which travels at around 11 miles per second, is expected to leave the solar system in the next few months, although it might take years to passes completely into inter-stellar region

On its journey, Voyager 1 has explored Jupiter and Saturn, taking dramatic pictures of both. It also took the famous “Pale Blue Dot” picture, an image of the earth from a distance 3.7 billion miles.

Voyager’s sister probe, Voyager 2, was also launched in 1977. After following Voyager 1 to Saturn and Jupiter, it was re-tasked with exploring Neptune and Uranus. Despite their age, both craft have continued to send Nasa information via radio waves.

Now the two spacecraft are to leave the solar system and move into the void that exists between solar systems in the Milky Way galaxy.

According to Ed Stone, the Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of Technology: “Voyager tells us now that we’re in a stagnation region in the outermost layer of the bubble around our solar system. Voyager is showing that what is outside is pushing back. We shouldn’t have long to wait to find out what the space between stars is really like.”

Both spacecraft have a copper phonograph record on board, with more than 100 photographs of the earth, a sample of languages and various sounds.

Both are expected to continue transmitting until around 2020, when they will run out of power.

Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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5 Countries With the Highest Military Expenditure

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 1, 2011

How much a country spends on its military budget is a reflection of a number of factors, including the size of the economy, the perceived military threat or opportunity, the influence of the private sector on government policy and the overall priorities of a society.

When we look at the absolute spending amount, the United States is by far the largest spender. According to theStockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) Yearbook 2011, America spent nearly $700 billion in 2010. This accounts for about 43% of the entire global military spending and is nearly 6 times more than the amount spent by the next largest, China. In fact, the United States spends more on its military than the total spent by the second largest (China), third largest (United Kingdom), fourth largest (France), fifth largest (Russia)… and fifteenth largest (Turkey) combined.

2011-11-29-Presentation1.jpg

So, while in absolute dollar amount the United States is an extreme outlier regarding its military spending, it is more appropriate to examine the normalized spending since comparing the absolute amount each country spends on its military another isn’t very fair. After all, we would certainly expect that a large country with one of the world’s largest economies like the Russian Federation would spend more than a small country like Lithuania. But what is the most appropriate way to normalize the spending?

If we look at the military expenditure per capita, we can control for differences in population between different countries. In this comparison we see once again that the United States is an outlier, spending an average of over $2,000 per person versus a global average that is about one-tenth that amount. Among the top 15 countries with the highest military expenditure, only two other countries had more than $1,000 per person spent on military, Saudi Arabia and Australia.

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Nobel Peace Prize 2011: The Most Disputed Winners (PHOTOS)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 9, 2011

  
This must be far from politics to go in respective way. Politics is the only way to make this prize controvers­ial.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Making Robots Human: National Geographic Probes Robots That Act, Look Like Us (PHOTOS)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 2, 2011


“In five or ten years robots will routinely be functionin­g in human environmen­ts,” says Reid Simmons, a professor of robotics at Carnegie Mellon. Yes this is interestin­g and very important point to be noted that there will still be lots of difference­s between robot and human being.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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