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Posts Tagged ‘Social Security’

The Real Battle in 2012 and Beyond (Video)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 13, 2012

By Rober Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley; Author, ‘Beyond Outrage’

 

It’s not merely Republicans versus Democrats, or conservatives versus liberals. The larger battle is between regressives and progressives.

Regressives want to take this nation backward — to before Social Security, unemployment insurance, and Medicare; before civil rights and voting rights; before regulations designed to protect the environment, workers, consumers, and investors. They want to sabotage much of what this nation has achieved over the last century. And they’re out to do it by making the rich far richer, turning Americans against one another in competition for a smaller and smaller slice of the pie, substituting private morality for public morality, and opening the floodgates to big money in politics. Read the rest of this entry »

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White House Burning: Putting Out the Wrong Fire

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 28, 2012

By Dean Baker, Co-Director of CEPR; Author, ‘The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive’

I have enormous respect for Simon Johnson. I first recall seeing him one late evening on a Bill Moyers segment in the middle of the financial crisis. I couldn’t quite believe that the former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund was complaining about the oligarchs in the financial industry using their control of the U.S. government to bail out their bankrupt banks. This was more likely attributable to too much alcohol or too little sleep than anything that could really be happening in this world.

Remarkably, it turned out to be true. Ever since the beginning of the financial crisis, Johnson, along with his co-author James Kwak, has been a tireless proponent of financial reform. Their blog, Baseline Scenario is an essential source for those following the debate over financial reform, as well as other issues. Their last book, 13 Bankers, is a great account of the growing concentration in the financial industry that left us with too big to fail banks.

Given their heroic role in the financial reform debate, I am not anxious to criticize Johnson and Kwak’s new book, White House Burning. But there are some important areas of difference that deserve attention.

The basic thesis of White House Burning is that the country is on an unsustainable fiscal path. Unlike some of the Chicken Littles leading the budget debate, Johnson and Kwak are responsible in how they lay out the case. There is no nonsense about runaway government spending. They explicitly refute this story. Most categories of government spending, except defense, have remained constant or fallen as a share of GDP since the budget surplus days of the late 90s. Read the rest of this entry »

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Boehner Debt Bill Passes House, Gets Defeated In Senate (UPDATE)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 30, 2011


This is the war not with other countries, but within the country.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Elderhood: A Buddhist Approach to Aging Well

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 22, 2011

By Lewis Richmond

This March I turned 64 — one year away from Medicare, two years away from Social Security. So there it is: I’m a baby boomer, a Buddhist, and one individual face to face with his own aging. But I’m not alone. Each day and every day for the next twenty years, 10,000 boomers will turn 65. This is a fact with enormous implications for our politics, our society — and, I believe, our spiritual life.

Forty years ago, when my Buddhist teacher Shunryu Suzuki was in his mid-sixties and the students around him were mostly in their 20s and 30s, someone asked him, “Why do we meditate?” He replied, “So you can enjoy your old age.” We all laughed and thought he was joking. Now that I am the age he was then, I realize he wasn’t joking at all. Some aspects of growing old can be hard to enjoy, and a spiritual practice can definitely help. This isn’t just theory; the Handbook of Religion and Health by Koenig et al. presents research showing that people who have a regular religious attendance or practice live, on average, 7 years longer than those who do not. That research result is even more significant when we remember that for the first time in human history, people will be living in relative good health into their 70s, 80s, and even 90s. What are we all going to do with that extra gift of time?

For the last several years I have been developing a contemplative approach to growing old and aging well. I have come to believe, as my teacher did, that spiritual practice can help us to age gracefully, and that the last part of life is a fruitful time for spiritual inquiry and practice. As part of my research, I logged on to Amazon, put in the search word “aging” and sorted by descending best-seller. Yes, there were a lot of best-selling books with the word “aging” in the title. But when I looked more closely I could see that most of the titles really weren’t about aging per se, but about postponing, disguising, or reversing aging. It was only when I set aside sales rank as my criterion that I found some good books with a spiritual approach to aging. Two of my favorites are The Gift of Years: Growing Older Gracefully by Benedictine nun Joan Chittister, and Spirituality and Agingby gerontology professor Robert C. Atchley. Read the rest of this entry »

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Most Americans Say Tax The Rich To Balance The Budget: Poll

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 6, 2011


And they will balance their balance sheet from poor.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Where Does Nuclear Disarmament Go From Here?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 5, 2011


Signed by President Barack Obama and Russian President Dimitry Medvedev last April, the treaty commits the two nations to cut the number of their deployed strategic (i.e. long-range­) nuclear warheads to 1550 each — a reduction of 30 percent in the number of these weapons of mass destructio­n. By providing for both a cutback in nuclear weapons and an elaborate inspection system to enforce it, New START is the most important nuclear disarmamen­t treaty for a generation­. But they most go furthermor­e with concrete strategy and implementa­tion.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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U.S. Retirement Deficit Reaches $6.6 Trillion: ‘God Help the Poor Gen Xers’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 17, 2010


Problem! Problem!! and Problem!!! Problem creates problem. We ourselves creating problem nobody else. First let us blame ourselves and only then everything will be ok.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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