Nepal – the country of the Buddha and the Mt. Everest

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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

Chris Demuth Advocates “Buddha was born in Nepal”

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 15, 2013

Chris Demuth talks about Fareed Zakaria’s book The Post-American World where Zakaria is giving absolutely wrong information on Buddha’s birthplace and Mr Demuth advocates not buying the book as it does lie. He was surprised with India’s claim that Buddha was born in India.  Mr Demuth also suggests signing the petition to advocate Buddha was born in Nepal and not in India.

Fareed Rafiq Zakaria is an Indian-American journalist and author. From 2000 to 2010, he was a columnist forzakaria-book1 Newsweek and editor of Newsweek International. In 2010 he became editor-at-large of Time. He is the host of CNN‘s Fareed Zakaria GPS. He is also a frequent commentator and author about issues related to international relations, trade, and American foreign policy.

Zakaria is the author of few books including The Post-American World. His last two books have both been New York Times bestsellers, and have been translated into over 25 languages.

Fareed Zakaria opened up about his plagiarism scandal in an interview with the New York Times.  He got into severe trouble after he was found to have lifted a paragraph from a recent New Yorker article for a column in Time. He was suspended from that magazine and from CNN.

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How To Keep Your Marriage Fresh

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 5, 2013

By Stacey Nelkin, Actress

MARRIAGE-SEX-largeLove and lust are very different — especially when it comes to a marriage.

Keeping the love alive is relatively easy, but maintaining passion for one another after years of marriage is damn near impossible.

In a recent article in The New York Times, Sonja Lyubomirsky, professor of psychology at the University of California at Riverside, explains the limits of lust in long-term relationships. She says that we can expect to stay turned on to our spouses for about two years and then perhaps again 18 or 20 years later when the kids go off to college.

So what are you supposed to do during those not-so-steamy 18 years?

The key is to keep it fresh — make your marriage feel new and exciting. We all know what familiarity breeds and it’s not desire! We humans are hard-wired to get excited by novelty. If you are striving to “keep it hot” with your significant other, you are not alone. Even Brad and Angelina have to work at it. And when children enter the mix, finding the time and motivation makes it even more of a challenge.

There might be light at the end of the 18 year-long tunnel, but it will take some creativity and initiative to make it through. I’m not there just yet as our kids are still in school, but my husband and I try to be innovative to impart renewed energy into our marriage.

Here are some tried and true tips on how to keep things interesting in your relationship: Read the rest of this entry »

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‘Reporter’s Privilege’ Under Fire From Obama Administration Amid Broader War On Leaks

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 19, 2012

By Michael Calderone and Dan Froomkin

RICHMOND, Va. — The Obama administration Friday morning continued its headlong attack on the right of reporters to protect their confidential sources in leak investigations.

Before a panel of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, a Department of Justice lawyer argued that New York Times reporter James Risen should be forced to testify in the trial of former CIA agent Jeffrey Sterling, who is charged with leaking classified information to Risen about a botched plot against the Iranian government.

Rather than arguing the specifics of the case, DOJ appellate lawyer Robert A. Parker asserted that there is no reporter’s privilege when a journalist receives an illegal leak of national security secrets.

When Judge Robert Gregory asked Parker to explain why the public’s interest in a free press was outweighed by the specific circumstances in this case, Parker declined. Read the rest of this entry »

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Personality: Arundhati Roy

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2012

Arundhati Roy (born 24 November 1961) is an Indian novelist. She won the Booker Prizein 1997 for her novel, The God of Small Things, and has also written two screenplays and several collections of essays. Her writings on various social, environmental and political issues have been a subject of major controversy in India.

She spent her childhood in Aymanam in Kerala, and went to school at Corpus ChristiKottayam, followed by the Lawrence School, Lovedale, in Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu. She then studied architecture at the School of Planning and Architecture, Delhi, where she met her first husband, architect Gerard da Cunha.

Roy met her second husband, filmmaker Pradip Krishen, in 1984, and played a village girl in his award-winning movie Massey Sahib. Until made financially stable by the success of her novel The God of Small Things, she worked various jobs, including running aerobics classes at five-star hotels in New Delhi. Roy is a cousin of prominent media personality Prannoy Roy, the head of the leading Indian TV media group NDTV,. She lives in New Delhi.

Early in her career, Roy worked for television and movies. She wrote the screenplays for In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones (1989), a movie based on her experiences as a student of architecture, directed by her current husband, and Electric Moon (1992); she also appeared as a performer in the first. Roy attracted attention in 1994, when she criticised Shekhar Kapur‘s film Bandit Queen, based on the life of Phoolan Devi. In her film review titled, ‘The Great Indian Rape Trick’, she questioned the right to “restage the rape of a living woman without her permission,” and charged Kapur with exploiting Devi and misrepresenting both her life and its meaning.

Roy began writing her first novel, The God of Small Things, in 1992, completing it in 1996. The book is semi-autobiographical and a major part captures her childhood experiences in Aymanam.

The publication of The God of Small Things catapulted Roy to instant international fame. It received the 1997 Booker Prize for Fiction and was listed as one of the New York TimesNotable Books of the Year for 1997. It reached fourth position on the New York Times Bestsellers list for Independent Fiction. From the beginning, the book was also a commercial success: Roy received half a million pounds as an advance; It was published in May, and the book had been sold to eighteen countries by the end of June. Read the rest of this entry »

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