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Posts Tagged ‘Time’

Time Person of the Year: THE EBOLA FIGHTERS

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 11, 2014

By Nancy Gibbs

time-ebola-cover-person-of-the-year-141222Not the glittering weapon fights the fight, says the proverb, but rather the hero’s heart.

Maybe this is true in any battle; it is surely true of a war that is waged with bleach and a prayer.

For decades, Ebola haunted rural African villages like some mythic monster that every few years rose to demand a human sacrifice and then returned to its cave. It reached the West only in nightmare form, a Hollywood horror that makes eyes bleed and organs dissolve and doctors despair because they have no cure.

But 2014 is the year an outbreak turned into an epidemic, powered by the very progress that has paved roads and raised cities and lifted millions out of poverty. This time it reached crowded slums in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone; it traveled to Nigeria and Mali, to Spain, Germany and the U.S. It struck doctors and nurses in unprecedented numbers, wiping out a public-health infrastructure that was weak in the first place. One August day in Liberia, six pregnant women lost their babies when hospitals couldn’t admit them for complications. Anyone willing to treat Ebola victims ran the risk of becoming one. Read the rest of this entry »

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Chris Demuth Advocates “Buddha was born in Nepal”

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 15, 2013

Chris Demuth talks about Fareed Zakaria’s book The Post-American World where Zakaria is giving absolutely wrong information on Buddha’s birthplace and Mr Demuth advocates not buying the book as it does lie. He was surprised with India’s claim that Buddha was born in India.  Mr Demuth also suggests signing the petition to advocate Buddha was born in Nepal and not in India.

Fareed Rafiq Zakaria is an Indian-American journalist and author. From 2000 to 2010, he was a columnist forzakaria-book1 Newsweek and editor of Newsweek International. In 2010 he became editor-at-large of Time. He is the host of CNN‘s Fareed Zakaria GPS. He is also a frequent commentator and author about issues related to international relations, trade, and American foreign policy.

Zakaria is the author of few books including The Post-American World. His last two books have both been New York Times bestsellers, and have been translated into over 25 languages.

Fareed Zakaria opened up about his plagiarism scandal in an interview with the New York Times.  He got into severe trouble after he was found to have lifted a paragraph from a recent New Yorker article for a column in Time. He was suspended from that magazine and from CNN.

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Fareed Zakaria Suspended For Plagiarism: Time Editor, CNN Host Apologizes For ‘Terrible Mistake’

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 11, 2012

The Huffington Post  |  By 

Fareed Zakaria

Time editor-at-large and CNN host Fareed Zakaria was suspended from both places for a month on Friday after admitting to lifting parts of a story from the New Yorker.

Conservative media watchdog Newsbusters was the first to spot the similarities between a Zakaria piece on gun control and an article by Jill Lepore that appeared in the New Yorker in April.

The Atlantic Wire posted a statement from Zakaria on Friday afternoon, taking full responsibility for the incident:

“Media reporters have pointed out that paragraphs in my Time column this week bear close similarities to paragraphs in Jill Lepore’s essay in the April 22nd issue of The New Yorker. They are right. I made a terrible mistake. It is a serious lapse and one that is entirely my fault. I apologize unreservedly to her, to my editors at Time, and to my readers.”

Later, Time announced Zakaria’s suspension:

Time accepts Fareed’s apology, but what he did violates our own standards for our columnists, which is that their work must not only be factual but original; their views must not only be their own but their words as well. As a result, we are suspending Fareed’s column for a month, pending further review.

CNN also said it was suspending Zakaria because he plagiarized the same material for a CNN.com blog post:

“We have reviewed Fareed Zakaria’s TIME column, for which he has apologized. He wrote a shorter blog post on CNN.com on the same issue which included similar unattributed excerpts. That blog post has been removed and CNN has suspended Fareed Zakaria while this matter is under review.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Deepak Chopra- Learn How to Meditate (Nauči meditirati)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on July 9, 2012

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The Supernatural (Edited Narrated and Directed by: Dhruba Adhikari)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 28, 2012

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Personality: Arundhati Roy

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2012

Arundhati Roy (born 24 November 1961) is an Indian novelist. She won the Booker Prizein 1997 for her novel, The God of Small Things, and has also written two screenplays and several collections of essays. Her writings on various social, environmental and political issues have been a subject of major controversy in India.

She spent her childhood in Aymanam in Kerala, and went to school at Corpus ChristiKottayam, followed by the Lawrence School, Lovedale, in Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu. She then studied architecture at the School of Planning and Architecture, Delhi, where she met her first husband, architect Gerard da Cunha.

Roy met her second husband, filmmaker Pradip Krishen, in 1984, and played a village girl in his award-winning movie Massey Sahib. Until made financially stable by the success of her novel The God of Small Things, she worked various jobs, including running aerobics classes at five-star hotels in New Delhi. Roy is a cousin of prominent media personality Prannoy Roy, the head of the leading Indian TV media group NDTV,. She lives in New Delhi.

Early in her career, Roy worked for television and movies. She wrote the screenplays for In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones (1989), a movie based on her experiences as a student of architecture, directed by her current husband, and Electric Moon (1992); she also appeared as a performer in the first. Roy attracted attention in 1994, when she criticised Shekhar Kapur‘s film Bandit Queen, based on the life of Phoolan Devi. In her film review titled, ‘The Great Indian Rape Trick’, she questioned the right to “restage the rape of a living woman without her permission,” and charged Kapur with exploiting Devi and misrepresenting both her life and its meaning.

Roy began writing her first novel, The God of Small Things, in 1992, completing it in 1996. The book is semi-autobiographical and a major part captures her childhood experiences in Aymanam.

The publication of The God of Small Things catapulted Roy to instant international fame. It received the 1997 Booker Prize for Fiction and was listed as one of the New York TimesNotable Books of the Year for 1997. It reached fourth position on the New York Times Bestsellers list for Independent Fiction. From the beginning, the book was also a commercial success: Roy received half a million pounds as an advance; It was published in May, and the book had been sold to eighteen countries by the end of June. Read the rest of this entry »

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Stephen Hawking’s 70th birthday: 17 things you need to know about the physicist

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 8, 2012

Happy Birthday to Professor Stephen Hawking, who today celebrates his 70th birthday – nearly fifty years after he was first diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

Here are 17 things you need to know about the most famous theoretical physicist in the world.

1) Born in Oxford on January 8 1942 – 300 years after the death of astronomer Galileo Galilei – Professor Hawking grew up in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

2) After being diagnosed with a rare form of motor neurone disease – amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – at the age of 22, Hawking was given just a few years to live.

3) Hawking is as much a celebrity as he is a scientist, having appeared on The Simpsons, Star Trek and having provided narration for a British Telecom commercial that was later sampled on a Pink Floyd album.

4) He had a difficult time at the local public school and was persecuted as a “swot” who was more interested in jazz, classical music and debating than sport and pop. Read the rest of this entry »

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What Happened Before Creation?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 6, 2012

By Robert Lanza 

Everyone knows that something is screwy with the way we visualize the cosmos. Theories of its origins screech to a halt when they reach the very event of interest — the moment of creation, the “Big Bang.”

The current scientific model proposes that the universe is like a watch that somehow wound itself and that will unwind in a semi-predictable way. Life arose by an unknown process, and then proceeded to change form under Darwinian mechanisms that operate under these same physical rules. Life contains consciousness, but the latter is poorly understood and is, in any case, solely a matter for biologists.

But there’s a problem. Consciousness isn’t just an issue for biologists; it’s a problem for physics. Nothing in physics explains how molecules in your brain create consciousness. The beauty of a sunset, the miracle of love, the taste of a delicious meal — these are all mysteries to science. It can’t explain how consciousness arose from matter; our understanding of this basic phenomenon of our existence is nil. Not coincidentally, consciousness comes up again in a completely different realm of science. Quantum theory, while working well mathematically, makes no logical sense. As new experiments show, particles seem to behave as if they respond to a conscious observer. Because that can’t be right, physicists have deemed quantum theory inexplicable. The simplest explanation — that particles actually do interact with consciousness at some level — is too far outside the model to be seriously considered.

But even putting aside the issues of consciousness, the current model leaves much to be desired when it comes to explaining the universe. The cosmos sprang out of nothingness 13.7 billion years ago, in a titanic event humorously labeled the Big Bang. We don’t understand where it came from and we continually tinker with the details, including adding an inflationary period with physics we don’t yet understand. Read the rest of this entry »

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Beyond space-time: Welcome to phase space

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 17, 2011

A theory of reality beyond Einstein’s universe is taking shape – and

 

 

a mysterious cosmic signal could soon fill in the blanks

IT WASN’T so long ago we thought space and time were the absolute and unchanging scaffolding of the universe. Then along came Albert Einstein, who showed that different observers can disagree about the length of objects and the timing of events. His theory of relativity unified space and time into a single entity – space-time. It meant the way we thought about the fabric of reality would never be the same again. “Henceforth space by itself, and time by itself, are doomed to fade into mere shadows,” declared mathematician Hermann Minkowski. “Only a kind of union of the two will preserve an independent reality.”

But did Einstein’s revolution go far enough? Physicist Lee Smolin at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, doesn’t think so. He and a trio of colleagues are aiming to take relativity to a whole new level, and they have space-time in their sights. They say we need to forget about the home Einstein invented for us: we live instead in a place called phase space.

If this radical claim is true, it could solve a troubling paradox about black holes that has stumped physicists for decades. What’s more, it could set them on the path towards their heart’s desire: a “theory of everything” that will finally unite general relativity and quantum mechanics.

So what is phase space? It is a curious eight-dimensional world that merges our familiar four dimensions of space and time and a four-dimensional world called momentum space.

Beyond space-time: Welcome to phase space – space – 08 August 2011 – New Scientist.

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Could This Theory Provide a Glimpse of Our Ultimate Destiny?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on January 13, 2011


First let me practice.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Person of the Year 2010

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 15, 2010

For connecting more than half a billion people and mapping the social relations among them; for creating a new system of exchanging information; and for changing how we all live our lives, Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is TIME’s 2010 Person of the Year.

By LEV GROSSMAN

On the afternoon of Nov. 16, 2010, Mark Zuckerberg was leading a meeting in the Aquarium, one of Facebook’s conference rooms, so named because it’s in the middle of a huge work space and has glass walls on three sides so everybody can see in. Conference rooms are a big deal at Facebook because they’re the only places anybody has any privacy at all, even the bare minimum of privacy the Aquarium gets you. Otherwise the space is open plan: no cubicles, no offices, no walls, just a rolling tundra of office furniture. Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO, who used to be Lawrence Summers’ chief of staff at the Treasury Department, doesn’t have an office. Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO and co-founder and presiding visionary, doesn’t have an office.

The team was going over the launch of Facebook’s revamped Messages service, which had happened the day before and gone off without a hitch or rather without more than the usual number of hitches. Zuckerberg kept the meeting on track, pushing briskly through his points — no notes or whiteboard, just talking with his hands — but the tone was relaxed. Much has been made of Zuckerberg’s legendarily awkward social manner, but in a room like this, he’s the Silicon Valley equivalent of George Plimpton. He bantered with Andrew “Boz” Bosworth, a director of engineering who ran the project. (Boz was Zuckerberg’s instructor in a course on artificial intelligence when they were at Harvard. He says his future boss didn’t do very well. Though, in fairness, Zuckerberg did invent Facebook that semester.) Apart from a journalist sitting in the corner, no one in the room looked over 30, and apart from the journalist’s public relations escort, it was boys only.(See pictures inside Mark Zuckerberg’s inner circle.) Read the rest of this entry »

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The End of Time

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 1, 2010

Huffington Post By Ann Reynolds*

What will our future be? Everyone wants to know. Depending on who you listen to, one future is new and exciting, the other terminal and scary.

Why is “One Day at a Time” so hard to do? Is it because we just can’t bear to live without time?

Just being here Today can be a challenge. If we live in the past, we may spend Today there. And if we live in the future, we probably remember the past, but may not even recognize Today. Time is complicated.

We invented clocks that record our invented time no matter what we think or do. Since we invented all this, it sure seems we could perceive time in any way we choose.

We’re also told we don’t have the power to alter time in either direction. We’re young but never get to be older, or we’re older and never get to be younger, but is this true? Are we buying into a certain time based on how others compartmentalize us based on chronology? Read the rest of this entry »

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