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Posts Tagged ‘Women’s Rights’

Happy International Women’s day

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 6, 2015

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world.

History:

For more than a century, March 8th has been the day to commemorate and celebrate the fight of working class and revolutionary women for a better deal and a socialist society. Its origins are in the struggles for equal pay and decent conditions amongst women in the USA in the 19th century.

On March 8, 1857, garment workers in New York City marched and picketed, demanding improved working conditions, a ten hour day, and equal rights for women. Their ranks were broken up by the police. Fifty-one years later, March 8, 1908, their sisters in the needle trades in New York marched again, honouring the 1857 march, demanding the vote, and an end to sweatshops and child labour. The police were present on this occasion too.

A conference in 1910 of socialist women involved in the Second International, adopted a proposal of the German revolutionary fighter, Klara Zetkin, to establish an International Women’s Day. Russian women began to observe this on the last Sunday in February, according to the pre-revolutionary Julien calendar.

Womens Day New York

In 1917 this was the day the working women of Petrograd literally started a revolution. In protest at rising prices and food shortages, they filed into the centre of the city, calling on all  fellow workers to join them. This was actually March 8th according to the (Gregorian) calendar used elsewhere in the world.’Down with hunger!’ ‘Down with the war!’ Hunger was claiming the lives of thousands of children, along with those of older men and women, and the very sick and very poor. The First World War was claiming the lives of millions of farm labourers and workers at the front. The ‘February Revolution’ of 1917, which threw off the yoke of Csarism across the Russian Empire, was the precursor of the victorious socialist revolution of October in the same year.

Scenario in the 21st Century:

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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Happy International Women’s day 2013

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2013

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members in the family come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. This is the real situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world.

History:

For more than a century, March 8th has been the day to commemorate and celebrate the fight of working class and revolutionary women for a better deal and a socialist society. Its origins are in the struggles for equal pay and decent conditions amongst women in the USA in the 19th century.

On March 8, 1857, garment workers in New York City marched and picketed, demanding improved working conditions, a ten hour day, and equal rights for women. Their ranks were broken up by the police. Fifty-one years later, March 8, 1908, their sisters in the needle trades in New York marched again, honouring the 1857 march, demanding the vote, and an end to sweatshops and child labour. The police were present on this occasion too.

A conference in 1910 of socialist women involved in the Second International, adopted a proposal of the German revolutionary fighter, Klara Zetkin, to establish an International Women’s Day. Russian women began to observe this on the last Sunday in February, according to the pre-revolutionary Julien calendar.

In 1917 this was the day the working women of Petrograd literally started a revolution. In protest at rising prices and food shortages, they filed into the centre of the city, calling on all  fellow workers to join them. This was actually March 8th according to the (Gregorian) calendar used elsewhere in the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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Waging a Global War FOR Women

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 3, 2012

Rep Carolyn Maloney, U.S. Representative for New York’s 14th District

I just returned from the “2012 International Parliamentarians Conference on the Implementation of the ICPD Programme of Action,” an international conference in Istanbul focused on the global effort to make life-saving family planning and reproductive health care available to all women around the world. The clear message at the conference was that we absolutely know what needs to be done. The question is, “will we do it?”

I am happy to report that the world is moving swiftly forward on this critically important agenda. Perversely, some legislators here in the U.S. are fighting the tide of history and working to roll back our commitments to help women and girls meet their reproductive health needs here and abroad.

First the good and inspiring news. More than 400 parliamentarians and delegates from 110 countries, including my colleague Rep. Jan Schakowsky and I, convened in Istanbul and reaffirmed our commitment to meet the goals of the 1994 Cairo International Conference in Population and Development. These goals include access to reproductive and sexual health services including family planning, reduction of infant and child mortality, reduction of maternal mortality, and universal education for boys and girls by 2015.

The 1994 “Cairo Consensus” envisions that rich countries will help poorer countries meet these needs, but it is not a free ride for anyone. In fact, developing countries, understanding the urgency of these issues, have agreed to provide fully two-thirds of the money needed to meet these goals. And why not? For every dollar developing country governments spend on meeting the unmet need for family planning they save $1.40 in maternal and newborn health care costs.

But this is not primarily about money. It is about women’s lives. Tewodros Melesse, the Director-General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation which works in 153 countries around the globe, highlighted the cost of inaction on the ICPD agenda. He said, “While maternal deathshave fallen by 47 percent since 1990, women in sub-Saharan Africa still have a 1 in 39 lifetime risk of dying due to pregnancy related causes.”

Fully meeting the unmet need for family planning services would result in global unintended pregnancies dropping from 75 million to 22 million. This would result in 25 million fewer abortions, 22 million fewer unplanned births, and 680,000 fewer deaths among women and newborns. This is a goal we should all be able to rally around. Read the rest of this entry »

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Saudi Arabia: Sports Minister Confirms Women’s Exclusion

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 6, 2012

Time Running Out for IOC to Roll Back Saudi Discrimination

(Beirut) – The Saudi sports minister and head of the Saudi National Olympic Committee confirmed on April 4, 2012, that Saudi Arabia will not support women in practicing sports. Prince Nawwaf al-Faisal said: “Female sports activity has not existed [in the kingdom] and there is no move thereto in this regard.”

“At present, we are not embracing any female Saudi participation in the Olympics or other international championships,” Prince Nawwaf continued.

“If the International Olympic Committee was looking for an official affirmation of Saudi discrimination against women in sports, the minister in charge just gave it,” said Christoph Wilcke, senior Middle East researcher at Human Rights Watch. “It is impossible to square Saudi discrimination against women with the noble values of the Olympic Charter.”

Speaking at a press conference in Jeddah that concluded a meeting of Arab youth and sports ministers, the prince claimed that the demand for women’s participation in the Olympics and other international championships came from Saudi women living abroad, and that his organizations would not officially support that demand, but would instead cooperate with those women to ensure their participation “occurred in the appropriate framework and comported with Islamic law.” The prince said he was in constant contact with the Saudi mufti and religious scholars to insure nothing “infringed upon the Muslim woman.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Subject for Debate: Are Women People?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2012

I’ve always assumed that women are fully autonomous human citizens—who vote, even!—but now I’m not so certain
Luke Sharrett / The New York Times / Redux

LUKE SHARRETT / THE NEW YORK TIMES / REDUX
From left: Catholic Bishop William Lori, the Rev. Matthew Harrison, Dr. Ben Mitchell, Rabbi Meir Soloveichik and Craig Mitchell are sworn in during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Feb. 16, 2012. The hearing was called to discuss the Obama administration’s contraceptive policy for employees at religious institutions.

All my adult life, I’ve been pretty sure I’m a sentient, even semi-competent human being. I have a job and an apartment; I know how to read and vote; I make regular, mostly autonomous decisions about what to eat for lunch and which cat videos I will watch whilst eating my lunch. But in the past couple of months, certain powerful figures in media and politics have cracked open that certitude.

You see, like most women, I was born with the chromosome abnormality known as “XX,” a deviation of the normative “XY” pattern. Symptoms of XX, which affects slightly more than half of the American population, include breasts, ovaries, a uterus, a menstrual cycle, and the potential to bear and nurse children. Now, many would argue even today that the lack of a Y chromosome should not affect my ability to make informed choices about what health care options and lunchtime cat videos are right for me. But others have posited, with increasing volume and intensity, that XX is a disability, even a roadblock on the evolutionary highway. This debate has reached critical mass, and leaves me uncertain of my legal and moral status. Am I a person? An object? A ward of the state? A “prostitute”? (And if I’m the last of these, where do I drop off my W-2?)

In the hopes of clarifying these and other issues, below I’ve recapped recent instances of powerful men from the fields of law, politics and literature tackling the question that has captured America’s imagination: Are Women People? Read the rest of this entry »

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Women dominate 2011 Nobel Peace Prize (Interview with winners)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 10, 2011

The Nobel Peace Prize 2011 was awarded jointly to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkol Karman “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work”.

  Tawakkol Karman

Tawakkol Karman

Residence at the time of the award: Yemen

Prize motivation: “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work”

Karman is a Yemeni journalist, politician and senior member of Al-Islah political party, and human rights activist who heads the group “Women Journalists Without Chains,” which she co-founded in 2005. She gained prominence in her country after 2005 in her roles as a Yemeni journalist and an advocate for a mobile phone news service denied a license in 2007, after which she led protests for press freedom. She organized weekly protests after May 2007 expanding the issues for reform. She redirected the Yemini protests to support the “Jasmine Revolution,” as she calls the Arab Spring, after the Tunisian people overthrew the government of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011. She has been a vocal opponent who has called for the end of President’s Ali Abdullah Saleh regime.

Tawakel Karman was born on 7 February 1979 in MekhlafTa’izz province, Yemen. She grew up near Taiz, which is the third largest city in Yemen and is described as a place of learning in a conservative country. She is the daughter of Abdel Salam Karman, a lawyer and politician, who once served and later resigned as Legal Affairs Minister in Ali Abdullah Saleh’s government. She is the sister of Tariq Karman, who is a poet, and Safa Karman, who works for Al-Jazeera. She is married to Mohammed al-Nahmi and is the mother of three children.

Karman earned an undergraduate degree in commerce from the University of Science and Technology, Sana’a and a graduate degree in political science from the University of Sana’a.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Hillary Clinton Promotes Women’s Rights Treaty That U.S. Has Not Yet Joined

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 21, 2011


Hillary Clinton, first US must sign before to promote it
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Global Health Initiative’s Missing Piece In Nepal

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 25, 2011

 

President Obama’s ambitious Global Health Initiative — announced to a receptive international community in 2009 — is faltering as budget constraints and shaky implementation limit the impact of the multibillion-dollar program.

LAMAHI, Nepal – United States President Barack Obama set up the Global Health Initiative to take a more comprehensive approach to improving health care in developing nations. In particular, his administration has given great weight to saving the lives of women and to supporting countries’ priorities in health care.

But there’s one exception: abortion.

In Nepal, that exclusion is in plain view, and many say the lack of support disregards evidence that safe abortions can save women’s lives. Nearly all experts here — with the notable exception of those employed by the U.S. government — publicly state that the best way to improve maternal health is by offering a wide range of services that includes more awareness about and access to safe abortion.

In a long-standing U.S. law, stretching back nearly 40 years, Congress has prevented any foreign aid for abortions.

The politics in Washington around the issue of funding abortion have become so heated in recent months that many global health supporters on Capitol Hill won’t even talk about family planning services because so many conservatives falsely equate it with abortion.

“Most of the young women don’t know about abortion facilities or that it is legal.”

~Khem Karki, Executive Director of SOLID Nepal

Anti-abortion advocates have accused Obama and his administration of using the GHI as part of a larger strategy to link abortion rights to universal access to reproductive health. An article in the New American last year by senior editor William F. Jasper argues that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has used “‘reproductive health’ and other similar code words … in attempts to camouflage policies that promoted abortion.” Read the rest of this entry »

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World’s Most Dangerous Countries For Women: Thomson Reuters Foundation Survey

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 17, 2011


I heard lots of cases in India but not in other countries. Due to dowry system every year hundreds of women are being killed there.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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David Cameron’s ‘Calm Down, Dear’ Comments Toward Parliament Member Slammed As Sexist

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 28, 2011


It was yesterday’­s one of the most highlighte­d news.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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International Women’s Day: To the Next 100 Years

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2011


Good stuff!
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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International Women’s Day 2011: World’s Most Inspiring Women (PHOTOS)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 8, 2011


Most of them are really brave women.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Happy International Women’s day 2011

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 7, 2011

Respectable and Dear ladies,

I would like to wish my best wishes to all the ladies on the occasion of International Women’s day 2011.

For most of you this sort of wishes could be enough, however; millions and millions women from different parts of the world, this day could mean something more than this due to various functions and commitments for them from different leaders and activists. They work more than men, but they are exploited, abused and violated by men. Somewhere they cannot eat whenever they want – they need to wait until their husband and other male members come and eat first. Even they have to suppress their feelings. They are like toys and machines for men. Just I would like to give you all a clear picture in short about the situation of millions and millions of women in different parts of the world. Everything seems to be separate, but they are interlinked each other in many ways, so any incident in any part of the world could affect others in different ways depending upon Read the rest of this entry »

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Umma Islamic Party, Saudi Arabia’s First Political Party, Formed By Moderate Scholars

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 11, 2011


This could be the decade for Middle East
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Sudan Flogging Video Sparks Outrage (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on December 13, 2010


God! So cruel. Why the other people could not stop the police?
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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